UNIVERSITY CATALOG
2016-2017



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

Studying English literature and language has often been cited as one of the great noble endeavors undertaken: inspiring and fulfilling. As the historian Barbara Tuchman put it, great books are “engines of change (as the poet said), windows on the world and lighthouses erected in the sea of time. They are companions, teachers, [. . .] bankers of the treasures of the mind. Books are humanity in print.” While Tuchman’s grand and overarching sentiment finds sympathy in the English Department, studying literature also has practical and immediate benefits, and the English Department is just as committed to the teaching of rigorous analysis, clear and successful communication, good writing, and cultural critique and understanding.

For students majoring or minoring in English, the program provides a sound foundation in the structure of the English language and its literary traditions; it also educates students in the exploration of the relationships of language and literature to the individual and society, and to history and politics. The program also provides a broad range of American, British, and world literature carefully selected by the faculty to include work by women and men of diverse backgrounds, and in a variety of literary forms and periods.

Thus, students’ command of written language, ability to analyze concepts, and broad understanding of human nature and social realities may give a competitive advantage in the pursuit of careers in a variety of fields, including education, media, business, and civil service or, with appropriate graduate work, in professions such as law and higher education.

Mission

In keeping with the American University of Kuwait’s liberal arts tradition, the English department provides students with the ability to use the English language effectively, think critically, and reach their full potential as creative individuals, engaged citizens, and lifelong learners. Through its emphasis on developing cultural awareness, rhetorical flexibility, information literacy, and appreciation for literary traditions, the department prepares students for the increasingly complex challenges of the 21st century.

Values

The English Department was able to recognize and articulate the following Five Core Values as being imperative to the success and well-being of the department:
  • Honesty.The English Department understands honesty to mean telling the truth. In an academic sense, honesty means representing original work and being transparent and accountable. This applies to all characteristics of the AUK community.
  • Freedom. The English Department envisions freedom as being allowed to make choices appropriate to the University’s objectives as well as encouraging students and faculty the opportunity to express their views without fear of reprisal in a supportive environment.
  • Quality. The English Department values quality as a measurement of the effectiveness of any task, be it curricular or extra-curricular.
  • Integrity. The English Department supports a code of conduct that affirms the individual’s right (faculty, staff or student) to express himself morally, intelligently and respectfully
  • Diversity. The English Department embraces the idea that a healthy and respectful appreciation for that which is different and new is the cornerstone to any serious educational undertaking.

Vision

The English Department at the American University of Kuwait aspires to be a leading English Department recognized locally, if not regionally, for it academic excellence and the accomplishments of its graduates

Bachelor of Arts in English


Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the AUK major in English, the student will be able to:

  • Recognize a wide range of literary works of world cultures, sub-cultures and minority groups.
  • Compare and contrast texts produced in different periods and genres.
  • Identify and discuss representative authors, works and movements.
  • Analyze cultural and literary texts using theory.
  • Develop independent thought and judgment to carry out research projects.
  • Develop and communicate ideas clearly in writing.
  • Evaluate cultural and literary texts within socio-political, historical, and economic contexts.

English majors begin their coursework with an introduction to literary studies, move on to surveys of western and world literatures in English, and then advance to courses that focus on particular motifs, genres, critical approaches, time periods, authors, or countries.

Admission To The Program

Formal admission to the major requires a cumulative GPA of 2.00.

University Degree Requirements (124 Credit Hours)

To receive a Bachelor of Arts in English, students must complete at least 124 credit hours. In addition, students are required to complete a minimum of 36 credit hours of upper-level courses (300-level and above) at AUK of which at least 18 credits hours need to be taken in the major

General Education Requirements (49)
Major Requirements composed of: (45)
  Core Courses (18)
  English Electives (27)
Free Electives (30)

Major Requirements (45 Credit Hours)

Major requirements include 6 required core courses (18 credit hours), followed by 9 English Elective courses (27 credit hours):

Core Courses (18 credit hours)
Students must complete the following 6 core courses (18 credit hours):

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies (3)
ENGL 220 Survey of World Literatures I (3)
ENGL 221 Survey of World Literatures II (3)
ENGL 300 History of the English Language (3)
ENGL 415 Literary Theory and Criticism (3)
ENGL 450 Senior Seminar (3)

English Electives (27 credit hours)
In consultation with their academic advisor, students must complete nine courses (27 credit hours) from any remaining ENGL 300 or 400-level courses, or ENGL 207, or any one TRAN 200-300-level course. ENGL 485: Senior Thesis (3 credit hours), applies as an English elective.

Free Electives (30 Credit Hours)

Choose ten courses (30 credit hours) in consultation with the academic advisor.

Bachelor of Arts in English 2016-2017 4 Year Plan*

At least 36 credit hours must be at the 300-400 level

YEAR 1 SEMESTER 1 (FRESHMAN)
Prefix Number Title
Gen Ed ENGL 100 Foundations of Academic Reading and Writing 4
Gen Ed UNIV 100 Essentials of Learning 2
Gen Ed MATH 100 College Algebra 3
Gen Ed ARAB [A] 3
Gen Ed HUMM [H] 3
         
YEAR 1 SEMESTER 2 (FRESHMAN)
Prefix Number Title
Gen Ed ENGL 101 Approaches to Critical Reading and Writing 3
Gen Ed MATH [M] 3
Gen Ed ARAB [K] 3
Gen Ed UNIV 110 University, Community, and Citizenship 3
Gen Ed HUM [H]   3
         
YEAR 2 SEMESTER 3 (SOPHOMORE)
Prefix Number Title
Gen Ed ENGL 102 Writing and Information Literacy 3
Gen Ed CSIS [T] 3
Major Core ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies 3
Major Core ENGL 220 Survey of World Literatures I 3
Free Elective 3
         
YEAR 2 SEMESTER 4 (SOPHOMORE)
Prefix Number Title
Gen Ed SCI [P] 3
Gen Ed SOCSC [S] 3
Major Core ENGL 221 Survey of World Literatures II 3
ENGL Elective ENGL ENGL Elective 3
Free Elective 3
Free Elective 3
         
YEAR 3 SEMESTER 5 (JUNIOR)
Prefix Number Title
Gen Ed SCI [P] 4
Major Core ENGL 300 History of the English Language 3
ENGL Elective ENGL ENGL Elective 3
ENGL Elective ENGL 300 - 400 ENGL Elective 3
Free Elective 300 - 400 3
         
YEAR 3 SEMESTER 6 (JUNIOR)
Prefix Number Title
ENGL Elective ENGL 300 - 400 ENGL Elective 3
ENGL Elective ENGL ENGL Elective 3
Gen Ed SOCSC [S] 3
Free Elective 3
Free Elective 3
         
YEAR 4 SEMESTER 7 (SENIOR)
Prefix Number Title
Major Core ENGL 415 Literary Theory and Criticism 3
ENGL Elective ENGL 300 - 400 ENGL Elective 3
ENGL Elective ENGL 300 - 400 ENGL Elective 3
Free Elective 300-400 3
Free Elective 300-400 3
         
YEAR 4 SEMESTER 8 (SENIOR)
Prefix Number Title
Capstone ENGL 450 Senior Seminar 3
ENGL Elective ENGL 300 - 400 ENGL Elective 3
ENGL Elective ENGL 300 - 400 ENGL Elective 3
Free Elective 3
Free Elective 3

* Your progress through the plan will vary depending on your English and Mathematics placement, as well as other factors.

Minor in English (18 Credit Hours)


Students wishing to minor in English are required to take six courses (18 credit hours). Students must take the following three core courses (9 credit hours):

ENGL 200 Introduction to Literary Studies (3)[H]
ENGL 220 Survey of World Literatures I (3)[H]
ENGL 221 Survey of World Literatures II (3)[H]

Students must also take three additional courses (9 credit hours) from any 300 or 400-level English courses, or ENGL 207, or any one TRAN 200-300-level course.

Internship


ENGL 470: Internship

The internship program provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate their capacity for leadership, teamwork, and business activity in the context of work experience. Internships are completed in the junior or senior year and while in residency at AUK.

The student is limited to a maximum of 6 credit hours of internship. A maximum of 3 credit hours (taken in increments of 1, 2, or 3 credit hours) may be applied toward any one major. If a student takes an additional 1-3 credit hours of internship, those credits may be counted towards a student’s second major, minor, or as free electives. For the duration of the semester, students are responsible for working 40 hours per semester for each credit hour. Students are to refer to the English Department’s internship handbook for further details of the internship process, requirements, and method of assessment.

Faculty


AWWAD, Rawda, University Provost, Professor of English; Ph.D., 1997, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

BUCKTON-TUCKER, Rosalind, Assistant Professor of English; Ph.D., 1976, University of Leicester, UK.

CRACE, Benjamin, Instructor of English Writing; MA, 2001, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky, USA.

DeANGELIS, Angelica, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature; Ph.D., 2002, University of California-Santa Barbara, California, USA.

HADBAWNIK, David, Department Chair, Assistant Professor of English, Ph.D., 2015, University at Buffalo, New York, USA,

HENNESSEY, Katherine, Assistant Dean - Curriculum, Assistant Professor of English, Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA - 2008

LOOMIS, Craig, Associate Professor of English Language and Literature; Ph.D., 1992, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, USA.

MAHFOUZ, Inas, Assistant Professor of English; Ph.D., 2008, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.

MOHAMMAD, Malek, Assistant Professor of English; Ph.D., 2010, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA.

MUZAFFAR, Hanan, Dean of Student Affairs, Assistant Professor of English; Ph.D., 2000, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsylvania, USA.

NASSIR, Ghazi, Professor of English Language and Literature; Ph.D., 1989, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA.

NIXON, Kathy, Assistant Professor of English; Ph.D., 2008, University of  Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA.

PARKS, Derek, Instructor of English Writing; MA, 1989, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA.

QUEEN, Mary, Dean of Academic Support Services, Associate Professor of Writing and Rhetoric; Ph.D., 2005, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, USA.

SIRAKI, Arby, Assistant Professor of English; Ph.D., 2013, University of Ottawa, Canada.

VALI, Abid, Assistant Professor of English; Ph.D. 2014, University of Otago, New Zealand.

ZIGON, Tina, Assistant Professor of English; Ph.D., 2016, University of Buffalo, New York, USA.

 

Back to top