UNIVERSITY CATALOG
2016-2017



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES


Mission

The mission of the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences is to advance knowledge of humanity through critical inquiry. The department strives to achieve this mission by employing multidisciplinary methods to examine the human mind, individual and group behavior, societies, and cultures.

Values

The Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences endorses the core values of a liberal arts education and supports the values of professionalism, dedication, honesty, and transparency in all academic and professional activities.

Vision

The Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences aspires to offer intellectually engaging, challenging, and dynamic programs in anthropology and psychology for the enrichment of university faculty, students, and the public. The department seeks to advance the disciplines of anthropology and psychology by pursuing excellence in all areas of teaching, research, and service, both locally and internationally.

Disciplines

The Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences includes the following disciplines (fields of study):

  • Social and Behavioral Sciences – Concentration in Anthropology (SBSA)
  • Psychology (PSYC)
  • Environmental Studies (ENVS)

Degree Programs

The Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences oversees the following degree programs:

Major

  • Bachelor of Arts in Social and Behavioral Sciences – Concentration in Anthropology

Minors

  • Social and Behavioral Sciences – Concentration in Anthropology
  • Environmental Studies

Bachelor of Arts in Social and Behavioral Sciences - Concentration in Anthropology


The Social and Behavioral Sciences – Concentration in Anthropology major is the study of human beings and societies across time and around the globe. This includes how human societies and cultures comprise, and are shaped by, natural and human-made environments, systems of social groupings and status relationships, material exchanges, and capacities for symbolic expression and communication; as well as issues such as class formation, gender relationships, ethnicity and ethnic revitalization, violence, visual culture and mass media, and migration.

Graduates of the SBSA program find employment in government agencies, non-governmental organizations, international aid and development agencies, and in the private sector in management positions, community service, social service, and in media and research organizations. With knowledge of quantitative and qualitative research methods, graduates can also be employed by research and consulting agencies, polling organizations, and print and electronic media institutions. Students can also pursue graduate studies in anthropology, cultural studies, social work, media studies, and related fields.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the AUK major in Social and Behavioral Sciences – Concentration in Anthropology, the student will be able to:

  • Recognize the fundamental concepts in social and behavioral sciences with regard to different societies and cultures.
  • Examine how categories of difference are socially constructed.
  • Examine how culture constructs behaviors of everyday life.
  • Demonstrate sensitivity to diverse cultural perspectives, critical in today’s global society.
  • Apply appropriate ethical standards in the study and research of other cultures.
  • Assess the impact of global media, telecommunication, travel, migration, and immigration on societies and cultures

University Degree Requirements (124 Credit Hours)

To receive a Bachelor of Arts in Social and Behavioral Sciences – Concentration in Anthropology, students must complete at least 124 credit hours. Students should be mindful of the College requirement that a minimum of 36 hours of upper-level (300-level and above) courses must be completed at AUK. Eighteen (18) of these upper-level hours must be taken in the SBSA major.

General Education Requirements (49)
Major Requirements, composed of: (45)
  Core Courses (9)
  Concentration Courses (36)
Social and Behavioral Science Electives (12)
Free Electives (18)

Major Requirements (45 Credit Hours)

The major in Social and Behavioral Sciences has a core of 3 required courses (9 credit hours):

Core Courses (9 credit hours)
SBSA 101 Introduction to Social and Behavioral Sciences, Concentration in Anthropology (3)[S]
SBSA 200 Ethnographic and Qualitative Research Methods (3)[S]
SBSA 485 Capstone: Seminar in Social and Behavioral Sciences, concentration in Anthropology (3)

Concentration Courses (36 credit hours)
Students must complete, in consultation with their academic advisors, a total of 36 credit hours from the courses listed below. Twelve of these total credit hours must be upper-level (300-level or above).

SBSA 205 Fundamentals of Arab Society (3)[K,S]
SBSA 210 Arab Society and Culture (3)[K,S]
SBSA 214 Lost Worlds (3)[S]
SBSA 218 Museums as Artifacts (3)[S]
SBSA 220 Culture and Visual Arts (3)[S]
SBSA 222 Global Media and Spaces of Identity (3)[S]
SBSA 224 Shopping and Consumerism (3)[S]
SBSA 226 The Material Culture of Clothing (3)[S]
SBSA 235 Identity, Difference and Deviance (3)[S]
SBSA 239 Nation and Migration (3)[S]
SBSA 249 Images of Women in the Media (3)[S]
SBSA 255 Health, Medicine and Curing (3)[S]
SBSA 260 Ethnographic Film (3)[S]
SBSA 265 South Asian Film: A Global Perspective (3)[S]
SBSA 270 The Indigenous Americas (3)[S]
SBSA 280 Kinship and Family in the Global Era (3)[S]
SBSA 341 Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3)[S]
SBSA 342 Gender Relations in the Arab World (3)[S]
SBSA 344 Tourism and Culture Change (3)[S]
SBSA 345 Globalization: Opportunities and Challenges (3)[S]
SBSA 348 Anthropology of Human Rights (3)[S]
SBSA 360 Gender Relations in the Arab World (3)[S]
SBSA 366 Popular Culture in South Asia: Film and Beyond (3)[S]
SBSA 370 Music of the Arabian Peninsula (3)[K,S]
SBSA 372 Anthropology of Business (3)[S]
SBSA 389 Special Topics (3)

Social and Behavioral Sciences Electives (12 Credit Hours)

Students must choose 4 courses (12 credit hours) of which one (3 credit hours) must be upper-level (300-level or above), in consultation with their academic advisor, from the following disciplines (fields of study): AMST, HIST, PLSC, IR, PSYC, SBSA.

Free Electives (18 Credit Hours)

Majors are expected to take 18 credit hours of their choice from among courses in Arts and Sciences.

Social And Behavioral Sciences - Concentration in Anthropology 2016-2017 4 Year Plan*

At least 36 credit hours must be at the 300-400 level
YEAR 1 SEMESTER 1 (FRESHMAN)
Prefix Number Title
Gen Ed ENGL 100 Foundations of Academic Reading and Writing 4
Gen Ed UNIV 100 Essentials of Learning 2
Gen Ed MATH 100 College Algebra 3
Gen Ed ARAB [A] 3
Gen Ed HUM [H] 3
         
YEAR 1 SEMESTER 2 (FRESHMAN)
Prefix Number Title
Gen Ed ENGL 101 Approaches to Critical Reading and Writing 3
Gen Ed MATH [M] 3
Gen Ed HUM [H] 3
Gen Ed SOCSC [S] 3
Major Core SBSA 101 Introduction to Social and Behavioral Sciences, Concentration in Anthropology 3
         
YEAR 2 SEMESTER 3 (SOPHOMORE)
Prefix Number Title
Gen Ed ENGL 102 Writing and Information Literacy 3
Gen Ed UNIV 110 University, Community, and Citizenship 3
Gen Ed ARAB [K] 3
Major Core SBSA 200 Ethnographic and Qualitative Research Methods 3
Major Concentration SBSA
         
YEAR 2 SEMESTER 4 (SOPHOMORE)
Prefix Number Title
Gen Ed SCI [P] 3
Gen Ed CSIS [T] 3
Major Concentration SBSA 3
Major Concentration SBSA 3
Free Elective 3
Free Elective 3
         
YEAR 3 SEMESTER 5 (JUNIOR)
Prefix Number Title
Gen Ed SCI [P] 4
Major Concentration 3
Major Concentration 3
Major Concentration 3
Major Elective AMST/HIST/PLSC/IR/PSYC/SBSA 3
         
YEAR 3 SEMESTER 6 (JUNIOR)
Prefix Number Title
Major Concentration 3
Major Concentration 3
Major Elective AMST/HIST/PLSC/IR/PSYC/SBSA 3
Major Elective AMST/HIST/PLSC/IR/PSYC/SBSA 3
Free Elective 3
         
YEAR 4 SEMESTER 7 (SENIOR)
Prefix Number Title
Gen Ed SOCSC [S] 3
Major Concentration 3
Major Concentration 3
Major Elective AMST/HIST/PLSC/IR/PSYC/SBSA 3
Free Elective 3
         
YEAR 4 SEMESTER 8 (SENIOR)
Prefix Number Title
Major Core SBSA 485 Seminar in Social and Behavioral Sciences, Concentration in Anthropology 3
Major Concentration 3
Major Concentration 3
Free Elective 3
Free Elective 3

* *Your progress through the plan will vary depending on your English and Mathematics placement, as well as other factors.

Minor in Social and Behavioral Sciences - Concentration In Anthropology (18 Credit Hours)


Students must complete the following course:

SBSA 101 Introduction to Social and Behavioral Sciences, Concentration in Anthropology (3)[S]

Students must also complete 5 additional courses (15 credit hours) from any of the Concentration Courses listed above for the SBSA major. At least 3 courses (9 credit hours) must be upper-level (300-level and above).

 

Minor in Environmental Studies (18 Credit Hours)


The minor in Environmental Studies allows students to take courses from a variety of disciplines in order to increase their awareness of the complex environmental issues faced by human societies.

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the AUK minor in Environmental Studies, the student will be able to:
  • Identify the scientific, technical, social, cultural, economic, and political frameworks related to global and regional environmental concerns, including the policy dimension of environmental issues.
  • Analyze environmental values in contemporary society.
  • Evaluate and advocate practical solutions to complex environmental problems.

Program Requirements

  • A grade of “C” or better in each course.
  • At least 6 credit hours must be taken in upper level courses (300-level or above).

To complete a minor in Environmental Studies, students must complete the following courses:

Core Course (3 credit hours)
ENVS 101 Introduction to Environmental Studies (3)[S]
     
Environmental Sciences (3 credit hours)
Choose one course from the following:
     
BIOL 105 Environmental Science (3)[P]
CHEM 103 Chemistry in Everyday Life (3)[P]
CHEM 103L Chemistry in Everyday Life Laboratory (1)[P]
PHYS 105 Environmental Physics (3)[P]
PSYC 202 Developmental Psychology (3)[S]
     
Environmental Studies Electives (12 credit hours)
Choose four courses (12 credit hours) from the following list. Three of these must be upper-level (300-400 level).
     
BIOL 220 Ecology (3)[P]
CHEM 305 Environmental Chemistry (3)[P]
ECON 363 Environmental & Natural Resources (3)
ECON 409 Economic Development (3)
ENVS 215 Environmental Data Analysis (3)[S]
ENVS 220 Energy & the Environment (3)[S]
ENVS 230 Environmental Geology (3)[P]
ENVS 305 Environmental Health (3)[P]
ENVS 310 Environmental Ethics (3)[S]
ENVS 320 Global Environmental Policy (3)[S]
ENVS 325 Health, Environment & Armed Conflict (3)[S]
ENVS 340 The Gendered Environment (3)[S]
ENVS 389 Special Topics (3)
GDES 337 Environmental Design (3)
IR 412 Sustainable Development (3)
SBSA 255 Health, Medicine and Curing (3)[S]
SBSA 344 Tourism and Cultural Change (3)[S]
     

Internship


The internship is a practicum course that explores the social and behavioral sciences through a variety of work experiences, both governmental and non-governmental. Students are expected to perform work for academic credit and submit, as part of their course requirements, written evaluative reports based on their experiences under the guidance of faculty of the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, as well as an oral presentation at the end of the internship. Students with a general average of at least “C” at the beginning of the senior year may petition the department for internship approval.

Grading

The grading scale used will be the standard scale for the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Grades will be determined as follows:

Field Experience Report 30%
Midterm Observations and Reflections 10%
Learning Logs 10%
Final Report 25%
Presentation 25%

Major Assignments

Field Experience Report: Students are required to turn in a comprehensive report that describes their field experience. Early in the semester, students will receive detailed information regarding the expectations with respect to compiling their report.

Midterm Observations and Reflections: The on-site supervisor will make the initial assessment and forward this to the 470 instructor. Students must meet with their coordinating 470 instructor halfway through the internship to discuss their progress. Within one week following the observation, students should submit a brief reflection paper (3-4 pages typed, double-spaced, 12 pt. font) to the professor who observed them. Students’ reflection papers should contain their own critical reflection on their learning experience.

Learning Logs: The learning log is designed to be an ongoing collection of student’s day-to-day work in the course and their own self-assessment of that work, as well as a record of their growth in understanding during the course. This will also help in future review of activities during the internship.

Intern’s Internship Final Report: At the end of the student’s period of work, the student is required to present a Report of Activity. The report is to record the activities that the student has completed. The report is reviewed by the 470 instructor. Additions may be requested after discussions with the student.

Presentation to the Program or Department: Students must prepare an oral presentation for the Program or Department.

Final Assessment

The final assessment begins with the on-site supervisor, who submits his/her report to the 470 instructor. The 470 instructor then confirms the on-site supervisor’s assessment and if necessary, discusses it with the on-site supervisor.

The 470 instructor takes into account all the above mentioned points for grading (see Grading) and then submits the final grade.

Overall Assessment

The most positive assessment of the student comes when the student is either encouraged to return to the company where the internship is carried out or, as may happen in rare cases, the student is offered immediate employment.

The most important assessment for the student is his/her understanding of the differences in the work day between the tasks and deadlines in the academic environment and the tasks and deadlines in the work environment.

Guidelines

  1. A student with a departmental average of at least “C” at the beginning of the senior year may elect to pursue an internship course.

  2. The Department of Social & Behavioral Sciences sets the standards for the internship and reserves the right to decide on the suitability of the work experience.

  3. The department may assist students to find suitable employment.

  4. Students are encouraged to find their own placements. However, the department must be advised before a student approaches a prospective organization.

  5. The 470 instructor will visit the place of work where the student will be working to determine if the environment is suitable and that the nature of the work and place of work are in synergy.

  6. Contact will be established between the 470 instructors and on-site supervisor to ensure that if any problems arise during the internship, there is a clear understanding of the roles each party will play to ensure that the student has a quality learning experience.

  7. A placement is not secured until it has been approved by the Program Lead and Department Chair of SBSA, and the student has signed and returned the Student Internship Agreement.

  8. A student must secure an internship for the entire semester.

  9. Students should work at least 2.5 hours per week for 1 credit hour; 5 hours per week for 2; and 7.5 hours per week for 3. A maximum of 3 credit hours (taken in increments of 1, 2, or 3 credit hours) may be applied toward any one major, if the major requires an internship. If a student takes an additional 1-3 credit hours of internship, those credits may be counted towards a student’s second major, minor, or as free electives.

  10. Students are required to work with the 470 instructor at least once a week to report on progress and activity.

  11. Any student who is dismissed from his/her internship must notify the Department Chair and withdraw if before the withdrawal deadline. Failure to do so within a reasonable amount of time will result in a failing grade.

  12. All students will be treated equally and given the same opportunities.

Attendance

In accordance with AUK policy, the expectation is that students will be present, on time, and prepared for every class meeting with the 470 instructor. Students are also required to be present, on time, and prepared for their internship.

Writing Standards and Academic Integrity

The quality of students’ ideas as well as their presentation will be taken into consideration when assigning grades. They are expected to produce written documents that include no spelling errors, and are easily read, well-organized, clearly understood, and grammatically correct. Students are encouraged to use the grammar and spell-check capabilities of their word-processor, and to ask their peers or staff from the AUK Writing Center to proofread their papers prior to submitting them to the professor. In accordance with AUK policy, a student’s grade on any assignment may be reduced if s/he fails to attend to these aspects of his/her written assignments. Furthermore, the university policy on academic integrity will be strictly adhered to in this course.

GULF STUDIES CERTIFICATE PROGRAM


Benefits of a Gulf Studies Certificate Program

  • Exposure to Gulf society, culture, and lifestyle
  • Opportunity to begin/expand Arabic language study.
  • Enhanced understanding of Arab traditions, history, and culture
  • Preparation for careers in a variety of fields.

The Gulf Studies Certificate Program is designed for visiting students or non-degree-seeking students who wish to spend a semester at AUK focusing on regional history, politics, society, culture, and the arts. Students are required to take a total of 4 courses (12 credit hours) from the courses recommended by the Director of the Center for Gulf Studies. Students are asked to contact the director for current course listings.

All courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better. Not all courses may be available every semester. As new courses are developed, more choices will become available for certificate electives. For students with no background in Arabic, ARAB 102 or ARAB 201 (Arabic as a Second Language I or II) is recommended. For students with a background in Arabic, ARAB 215 (Arab Composition I) or ARAB 205 (Survey of Arab-Islamic Civilization) is recommended.

It is recommended that students choose courses applicable to the Gulf Studies Certificate Program in both the Humanities (including the following prefixes: ARAB, ART, COMM, ENGL, and MUSC) and in the Social Sciences (including the following prefixes: HIST, IR, PLSC, and SBSA) in consultation with the director and/or their academic advisor.

Faculty


DINKHA, Juliet, Associate Professor of Psychology; Psy.D., 2000, Argosy University, Chicago, USA.

LUCIANO, Pellegrino, Assistant Professor of Anthropology; Ph.D., 2005, City University of New York, New York, USA.

MUNSHI, Shoma, Department Chair, Department of Communication & Media, Professor of Anthropology; Ph.D., 1991, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France.

ROSE, James L., Department Chair, Assistant Professor of Psychology; Ph.D., 1999, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA.

 

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