BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING


University Degree Requirements (144 Credit Hours)

To receive a Bachelor of Engineering in Computer Engineering, students must complete at least 144 credit hours. Students are required to complete a minimum of 36 credit hours of upper-level courses (300-level or above) at AUK, of which at least 18 credit hours need to be taken in the major.

General Education Requirements, composed of: (49)
  Related field requirements applicable to Gen Ed requirements (16)
  Remaining Gen Ed requirements (33)
     
Related Field Requirements not appicable to Gen Ed (29)
Major Requirements, composed of: (66
  Computer Engineering Core (52)
  Computer Engineering Electives (14)
  GDES Related Field Electives (9)
     

Major Requirements (66 Credit Hours)

Students must complete all Computer Engineering core courses (52 credit hours) and four elective courses and two lab electives (14 credit hours) from the Computer Engineering course electives.

Computer Engineering Core Courses (52 credit hours)
CPEG 210 Digital Logic Design (3)
CPEG 210L Digital Logic Design Laboratory (1)
CPEG 220 Computer Organization and Architecture (3)
CPEG 330 Microprocessors and Interfacing (3)
CPEG 330L Microprocessors and Interfacing Laboratory (1)
CPEG 340 Embedded System Design (3)
CPEG 340L Embedded System Design Laboratory (1)
CPEG 350 Data Communications and Computer Networks (3)
CPEG 475 Senior Design Capstone I (3)
CPEG 480 Senior Design Capstone II (4)[T]
CSIS 130 Computer Programming II (3)
CSIS 210 Data Structures and Algorithms (3)
CSIS 310 Introduction to Operating Systems (3)
CSIS 330 Software Engineering (3)
ELEG 220 Electric Circuits (3)
ELEG 220L Electric Circuits Laboratory (1)
ELEG 270 Electronics (3)
ELEG 270L Electronics Laboratory (1)
ELEG 320 Signals and Systems (3)
ELEG 320L Signals and Systems Laboratory (1)
ENGR 330 Engineering Economics (3)


Computer Engineering Course Electives (14 credit hours)
Four course electives (12 credit hours) and two lab electives (2 credit hours) must be selected, in consultation with the academic advisor, from 200-level or higher CPEG, ELEG, ENGR, and/or CSIS courses. The electives must be chosen according to the following rules:

  • At least two of the course electives must be CPEG courses.
  • At least one of the lab electives must be a CPEG lab.
  • At least two of the course electives must be 300-level or higher courses.
  • A maximum of one course elective can be selected from the following CSIS courses:
CSIS 230 Programming in a Second Language (3)
CSIS 250 Database Systems (3)
CSIS 255 Web Technologies (3)
CSIS 260 System Analysis and Design (3)
CSIS 300 E-Commerce (3)
CSIS 320 Principles of Programming Languages (3)
CSIS 370 Computer Graphics (3)
CSIS 400 Theory of Computation (3)
CSIS 405 Analysis of Algorithms (3)
CSIS 415 Artificial Intelligence (3)
CSIS 425 Advanced Software Engineering (3)
CSIS 440 Software Project Management (3)

The remaining course electives are restricted to the following:

ELEG 300 Engineering Electromagnetics (3)
ELEG 389 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (3)
ELEG 400 Environmental Aspects of Energy Systems (3)
ELEG 421 Control Systems (3)
ELEG 423 Instrumentation (3)
ENGR 200 Engineering Design (3)
ENGR 389 Special Topics (3)
CPEG 389 Special Topics in Computer Engineering (3)
CPEG 422 Digital Signal Processing (3)
CPEG 441 Hardware/Software Co-Design (3)
CPEG 450 Network Security (3)
CPEG 455 Wireless Networks and Mobile Systems (3)
CPEG 460 Robotics (3)
CPEG 470 Internship in Computer Engineering (1-3)

Lab electives are restricted to the following:

CPEG 201L Matlab Programming Laboratory (1)
CPEG 303L Advanced Programming for Engineers Laboratory (1)
CPEG 331L Automation and Data Acquisition Laboratory (1)
CPEG 350L Data Communications and Computer Networks Laboratory (1)
ELEG 421L Control Systems Laboratory (1)
ELEG 423L Instrumentation Laboratory (1)

Related Field Requirements (45 Credit Hours)

Thirteen courses (45 credit hours) of which (16 credit hours) are applicable to Gen Ed. The minimum passing GPA in related field requirements is 2.0 (C). The Related Field Requirements component is composed of six Math courses (20 credit hours), three Science courses (12 credit hours), one Computer Science course (4 credit hours), and three Management and Entrepreneurship courses (9 credit hours). Students must complete:

Math Courses (20 credit hours)
MATH 201 Calculus I (3)[M]
MATH 203 Calculus II (3)[M]
MATH 207 Advanced Engineering Mathematics (4)
MATH 210 Differential Equations (3)
MATH 213 Discrete Mathematics (3)
STATS 214 Statistics for Engineers (4)
     
Sciences Courses (12 credit hours)  
PHYS 115 General Physics I (4)[P]
PHYS 116 General Physics II (4)[P]
CHEM 101 General Chemistry I (4)[P]
     
Computer Science Course (4 credit hours)  
CSIS 120 Computer Programming I (4)[T]
     
Management and Entrepreneurship Courses (9 credit hours)  
MGMT 201 Principles of Management (3)
ENTR 201 Principles of Entrepreneurship (3)
ENTR 301 Intermediate Entrepreneurship (3)
     

 

Computer Engineering 2015-2016 4 Year Plan*

At least 36 credit hours must be at the 300-400 level
YEAR 1 SEMESTER 1 (FRESHMAN)
Prefix Number Title
CSIS 120 Computer Programming I 4
MATH 201 Calculus I 3 MATH 110 or by Placement Test
ENGL 101 Approaches to Critical Reading and Writing 3
UNIV 100 Essentials of Learning 2
PHYS 115 General Physics I 4 MATH 101 or MATH 103 or MATH 110
    TOTAL 16  
         
YEAR 1 SEMESTER 2 (FRESHMAN)
Prefix Number Title
CSIS 130 Computer Programming II 3 CSIS 120
ENGL 102 Writing & Info. Literacy 3 ENGL 101
MATH 203 Calculus II 3 MATH 201
PHYS 116 General Physics II 4 PHYS 115
CHEM 101 General Chemistry I 4 Co-req. MATH 201
    TOTAL 18  
         
YEAR 2 SEMESTER 3 (SOPHOMORE)
Prefix Number Title
CSIS 210 Data Structures and Algorithms 3 CSIS 130
MATH 213 Discrete Math 3 MATH 110
MATH 210 Differential Equations 3 MATH 203
CPEG 210 Digital Logic Design 3 Pre. CSIS 120 and Co-req. CPEG 210L
CPEG 210L Digital Logic Design Laboratory 1 Co-req. CPEG 210
ELEG 220 Electric Circuits 3 Pre. PHYS 116, Co-req. MATH 210, and Co-req. ELEG 220L
ELEG 220L Electric Circuits Laboratory 1 Co-req. ELEG 220
    TOTAL 17  
         
YEAR 2 SEMESTER 4 (SOPHOMORE)
Prefix Number Title
MATH 207 Advanced Engineering Mathematics 4 MATH 203
MGMT 201 Principles of Management 3 ENGL 102
UNIV 110 University, Community, and Citizenship 3
ELEG 270 Electronic 3 Pre. ELEG 220 and Co-req. ELEG 270L
ELEG 270L Electronic Laboratory 1 Co-req. ELEG 270
CPEG 220 Computer Organizations & Architecture 3 CPEG 210
Laboratory Elective 1
TOTAL 18
         
YEAR 3 SEMESTER 5 (JUNIOR)
Prefix Number Title
CPEG 330 Microprocessors and Interfacing 3 Pre. CPEG 220 and ELEG 270 and Co-req. CPEG 330L
CPEG 330L Microprocessors and Interfacing Laboratory 1 Co-req. CPEG 330
CPEG 350 Data Communications and Computer Networks 3 CPEG 210 and CSIS 210
Arabic I 3
ENTR 201 Principles of Entrepreneurship 3 MGMT 201
CSIS 310 Operating System 3 CSIS 210
Laboratory Elective 1
TOTAL 17
         
YEAR 3 SEMESTER 6 (JUNIOR)
Prefix Number Title
ENGR 330 Engineering Economics 3 MATH 203
ELEG 320 Signals and Systems 3 Pre. ELEG 220 and Co-req. ELEG 320L
ELEG 320L Signals and Systems Laboratory 1 Co-req. ELEG 320
STAT 214 Statistics for Engineers 4 MATH 203
CSIS 330 Software Engineering 3 CSIS 130
CPEG 340 Embedded System Design 3 CPEG 220
CPEG 340L Embedded System Design Laboratory 1 Co-req. CPEG 340
TOTAL 18
         
YEAR 4 SEMESTER 7 (SENIOR)
Prefix Number Title
CPEG 475 Senior Capstone Design I 3 Pre. CPEG 330; OR: Pre. CPEG 340 and Co-req. CPEG 330
ENTR 301 Intermediate Entrepreneurships 3 ENTR 201
Major Elective 3
Major Elective 3
Humanities Elective 3
Social Sciences Elective 3
TOTAL 18
         
YEAR 4 SEMESTER 8 (SENIOR)
Prefix Number Title
CPEG 480 Senior Capstone Design II 3 CPEG 475
Major Elective 3
Major Elective 3
Social Sciences Elective 3
Humanities Elective 3
Arabic II 3
TOTAL 18
         

* Does not include students’ placement into ENGL 100. Your progress through the plan will vary depending on your English and Mathematics placement, as well as other factors.

Dual Degree Program With Dartmouth's Thayer School Of Engineering


This initiative provides an opportunity for AUK students to go to Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College for a summer term (preferably sophomore year), and then to return for a fifth year after completing the requirements for the AUK Bachelor of Engineering (BE) degree in Computer Engineering. Upon successful completion of their AUK BE and the 5th year at Dartmouth, students will earn an ABET-accredited BE degree at Dartmouth. The Thayer School of Engineering degree is in General Engineering (not in Computer Engineering). Thayer is one of the top engineering schools in the United States. It is known for a distinctive curriculum, which emphasizes breadth of engineering training in a highly collaborative learning environment. AUK students admitted to this special program will study with Dartmouth faculty and students in Thayer’s state of the art facilities.

See: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/about/maclean.html

Admission to the summer program at Dartmouth is based on prior academic performance and recommendation letters. Admission to the 5th year program is based primarily on performance in the summer program at Dartmouth. No more than 10 students annually will be accepted into the program in its first two years; this is subject to admissions criteria. The cap may be adjusted after a trial period of two years.

Incoming students will receive program-specific orientation at Dartmouth, and AUK students will have seen substantial amounts of the material for Engineering Sciences 21 (ENGS 21), which will ease their transition. ENGS 21 is essential preparation for the 190-290 sequence of courses students will take upon their return to Dartmouth for the 5th Thayer BE year. AUK students will take all core courses required of Dartmouth AB and BE students (see list below). These courses are listed in the Thayer School of Engineering Catalog:
http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/undergraduate/index.html

Summer Term

  • ENGS 21
  • ENGS 22
  • ENGS 33 (or 25)

Sample Be Year Program (Year 5)

Fall Winter Spring
ENGS 190 (2A) ENGS 290 (arr) ENGS 112 (11)
ENGS 91 (12) ENGS 27 (2) ENGS 23 (9L)
ENGS 116 (10) ENGS 24 (10) ENGS 31 (12)

There are variations possible on this schedule depending on student interests. For more information onThayer School of Engineering, see:
http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/about/index.html

Internship


Eligibility: A student with a departmental average of at least “B-” at the beginning of the Junior or Senior year may elect to pursue an internship course. The Internship is completed in the following stages:

  1. Program Discussion: Potential interns (Junior or Senior majors) are advised on the nature and purpose of an internship. The essential point is that they learn that there is a significant difference between the theory they learn in the classroom and the practice they will encounter during their internship.

  2. Internship Contract Signed: The next stage is to have a meeting with the organization which has agreed to provide the internship. At this meeting the nature of the internship is discussed and the student, the off-campus supervisor, and the 470 instructor all sign the form. At this meeting special details of the internship are agreed in the format of a contract between the three parties.

  3. Visit to Place of Work: At the time of the contract signing, or at a time near to this meeting, the 470 instructor visits the place of work where the student is going to be working and checks that the environment is suitable and that the nature of the work and the place of work go together

  4. Contact Off-campus Supervisor: Contact is established between the off-campus supervisor and the 470 instructor to ensure that if any problems arise during the internship there is a clear understanding of the roles each party will play in making sure that the student has a quality learning experience.

  5. Bi-monthly Progress Reports from Intern: During the period of the internship, interns are expected to email the 470 instructor bi-monthly, at least once every other week, to report on progress and activity. Students are expected to record their activities so that they can in the future review what activities have occupied their time while they are on an internship

  6. Mid-term Assessment of the Intern: The midterm assessment of the intern is initially made by results of the bi-weekly progress reports. Also, the off-campus supervisor will be consulted by the 470 instructor before the mid-term grade is posted.

  7. Intern’s Internship Final Report: At the end of an intern’s period of work the intern is required to present a Report of Activity. This report is to record the activities that the student has completed. The program will provide a general template for the report. Students may add to the template. Once the report is submitted it is reviewed by the 470 instructor, additions may be requested during an interview and discussion with the student.

  8. Final Presentation: The student has to give a public presentation to the department about his/her experience

  9. Final Assessment: The final assessment begins with a final assessment by the off-campus supervisor. This is submitted by the off-campus supervisor. The 470 instructor then confirms the off-campus supervisor assessment. After the student presents his/her findings, the 470 instructor submits the final grade of either Pass or No Pass.

Grade Distribution

Bi-weekly progress reports 30%
Work supervisor report 10%
Final Report 40%
Final Presentation 20%

Guidelines

  1. The student is limited to a maximum of 6 credits hours of internship. A maximum of 3 credit hours (taken in increments of 1, 2 or 3 credits) may be applied to the major electives. An additional 3 credit hours of internship may be counted towards a second major, minor or as free electives.

  2. For the durations of the semester, 16 weeks, students should work at least 2.5 hours per week (for 1 credit); 7.5 hours per week (for 3 credits); 10 hours per week (for 4 credits); and 15 hours per week (for 6 credits). A minimum of 120 hours is required for 3 credits, 80 hours for 2 credits, and 40 hours for 1 credit.

  3. The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering sets the standards for the internship and reserves the right to decide on the suitability of the work experience.

  4. The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering may assist students to find suitable employment.

  5. Students are encouraged to find their own placements. However, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering must be advised before a student approaches a prospective organization.

  6. The 470 instructor will visit the place of work where the student will be working to determine if the environment is suitable and that the nature of the work and place of work are in synergy.

  7. Contact will be established between the 470 instructors and on-site supervisor to ensure that if any problems arise during the internship, there is a clear understanding of the roles each party will play to ensure that the student has a quality learning experience.

  8. A placement is not secured until it has been approved by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the student has signed and returned the Student Internship Agreement.

  9. Students are required to meet with the 470 instructor at least once a week to report on progress and activity

  10. Any student who is dismissed from his/her internship must notify the Department Chair immediately. Failure to do so within a reasonable amount of time will result in a failing grade.

Faculty


DAMAJ, Issam, Department Chair, Associate Professor of Computer Engineering; Ph.D., 2004, London South Bank University, London, UK.

EL-ABD, Mohammed, Assistant Professor of Computer Engineering, Ph.D., 2008, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

ESMAEILI, Seyed Ebrahim, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering; Ph.D., 2011, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada.

HUMMES, Detlef, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering; Ph.D., 1997, University of Duisburg, Germany

KHANAFER, Mounib, Assistant Professor of Computer and Electrical Engineering; Ph.D., 2012, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

YOUSAFZAI, Jibran Khan, Assistant Professor of Computer and Electronic Engineering, Ph.D., 2010, King’s College, London, United Kingdom

ZAHER, Ashraf, Associate Professor of Computer Engineering; Ph.D., 2001, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, USA.

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