Course Descriptions


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Accounting (ACCT)

ACCT 201 Principles of Financial Accounting  (4) 
An introduction and overview of financial accounting.  Topics include basic concepts and principles of accounting; the accounting cycle, financial statements, cash, cash flow statement, receivables, inventories, assets and liabilities and merchandizing operations.  PrerequisitMATH 103 or MATH 110.

ACCT 205 Managerial Accounting (3) 
An introduction to internal accounting including cost measurement, product costing, cost-volume relationship, budgeting and budget variance analysis, performance evaluation. Co-requisite or Prerequisite: ACCT 201. Prerequisite:  MATH 103 or MATH 110.

ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting I (3) 
This course begins in-depth analysis of financial accounting.  Topics include accounting standards and theory, the balance sheet, statement of cash flows, comprehensive income, revenue recognition, profitability analysis, receivables and investment valuation; inventory and departures from historic cost, operational assets and impairment. Prerequisite: ACCT 201.

ACCT 305 Intermediate Accounting II (3) 
This course builds on applications, standards, and practices taught in ACCT 301, providing in-depth analysis of financial accounting, advancing to consider liabilities and owners' equity.  Topics include accounting for current liabilities, contingencies, bonds, long term notes, pensions, leases, income tax and shareholders' equity, embracing contributed capital, retained earnings, and dividends and earnings per share. Co-requisite or Pre-requisite:  ACCT 301.

ACCT 334 Individual & Corporate Tax (3) 
An analysis of international taxation theory and the application of tax theory for domestic and international activity in Kuwait. Prerequisite: ACCT 201.

ACCT 369 Short Course (1 - 3) 
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit. Permission of Instructor.

ACCT 388 Independent Study (1 - 3) 
A research and writing project to be determined in consultation with the Instructor. Cannot be repeated for credit. Junior standing. Prerequisite: ACCT 201.

ACCT 389 Special Topics (3) 
Can be repeated for credit. Permission of Instructor.

ACCT 401 Advanced Managerial Accounting (3) 
Issues of cost management and its use to achieve organizational goals.  Relationship of performance measurement, compensation, authority to organizational structure, organizational development and success. Prerequisites: ACCT 205.

ACCT 405 Advanced Financial Accounting (3) 
This course builds on disciplinary knowledge and techniques provided in earlier Financial Accounting courses to develop higher order cognitive skills needed to address complex issues emerging in accounting.  Topics include: Accounting Theory, Concepts and Standards, Standard Setting Process, Emerging Issues, Accounting Institutions, Accounting Regulation, and Ethical Issues in Accounting.   Prerequisite: ACCT 301.

ACCT 413 Accounting Capstone: Auditing (3) 
Accounting and auditing principles and standards, reporting methods, controls and test of controls, function of the independent auditor. Prerequisites: ACCT 301.

ACCT 421  International Financial Reporting Standards (3) 
An overview of International Financial Reporting Standards and the accounting standards generally accepted in Kuwait. Students are introduced to the Financial Reporting requirements of global capital markets. Prerequisite: ACCT 201.

ACCT 470 Internship in Accounting (1 - 3) 
An Internship experience with the requirement that the student write a report summarizing what the internship job added to his or her knowledge of accounting and related fields. Students are limited to a maximum of 3 internship credit hours for any major and 6 credits overall. This is a pass/Fail course. Permission of Instructor.

American Studies (AMST)

AMST 121 US History since 1900 (3)[S] 
Examination of the major political and economic themes in the US from 1900 to the present. Topics will include the world wars, prohibition and the Depression, the rise of the US as a global power, the Cold War, and the Gulf War.

AMST 220 Early American Political History (3)[S]  
The course traces the political history of America from the period of European colonial settlement through the Gilded Age. Topics include colonialism, independence, the US Constitution, Jacksonian Democracy; the Civil War and Reconstruction, westward expansion and modernization. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

AMST 333 American Culture (3)[S] 
An interdisciplinary study of America's view of itself; contemporary society including race, ethnicity, politics, literature and film; issues of violence, discrimination, racism and attitudes that shape contemporary American culture.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.

AMST 369 Short Course (1 - 3)
A research and writing project to be determined in consultation with the instructor. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Pre-requisite:  Senior Standing and Permission of Instructor.

AMST 388 Independent Study (3) 
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Junior standing. Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite any 100 or 200-level HIST course, or AMST 121 or INST 204 or 205.

AMST 389 Special Topics (1 - 3) 
An analysis of international taxation theory and the application of tax theory for domestic and international activity in Kuwait. Prerequisite: ACCT 201.

AMST 402 American Social History in the Twentieth Century (3) 
The economic boom and the conservative/traditional 50s; the Civil Rights movement; the anti-war movement; the feminist movement; the counter-culture movement; the student movement; the response of the political right; the information revolution; transformation of the culture and the political landscape. Junior standing. Prerequisite: Any 100 or 200-level HIST course, or AMST 121 or INST 204 or 205.

AMST 409 American Foreign Policy since WWII (3)  
Investigation of American foreign policy since World War II; the process of decision making; the role of the Presidency, the State Department and Pentagon bureaucracy, the Congress, and Public Opinion.  Focuses on the Cold War and the Middle East. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor.

Arabic (ARAB)

ARAB 101       Arabic as a Second Language I          (3) [A]                
This course introduces the student to the Arabic alphabet, the script of modern written Arabic, and develops the student's knowledge in the four language skill areas. The materials are designed in the effective modern approach to foreign language teaching. This course is taught in the Arabic language. Prerequisite:  Arabic Admission Placement or Arabic Placement Exam score less than or equal to 4.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 114       Arabic Basic Language Skills            (3) [A]                
This course introduces students to basic Arabic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course is taught in the Arabic language. Students may not enroll and will not receive credit for a language-learning course taken below the level of the language-learning course into which they were tested. Prerequisite: Arabic Admission Placement or Arabic Placement Exam score between 5 and 14.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 150       Human Development in the Arab World                      (3) [H], [K]       
This course examines Human Development in the Arab World using the Reports of the UN Development Program and The Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development, which were released in 2003/2004. It provides students with detailed description and critical evaluation of the economic, demographic, social and political conditions in the Arab countries. This course is taught in the English language. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 201       Arabic for Non-Native Speakers II    (3) [A]                
This course extends ARAB 101 and is designed to enhance further the non-native speaker's knowledge and proficiency of Arabic. This course is taught in the Arabic language. Students may not enroll and will not receive credit for a language-learning course taken below the level of the language-learning course into which they were tested. Prerequisite: ARAB 101.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 205      Survey of Arab-Islamic Civilization  (3) [H], [K]        
The course acquaints students with the past influence and present importance of Arab-Islamic civilization. It investigates how Islam has shaped many different cultures in Asia, Europe and Africa over the last 1400 years. The religious, political and cultural values associated with Arab-Islamic culture will be discussed. Furthermore, students will be familiarized with the historical forces that shaped the past, and what these forces mean for the world today. This course is taught in the English language. This course satisfies the General Education Requirement for Arab Culture. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 215       Arabic Composition I                           (3) [A]                
This course introduces native speakers of Arabic-with English curricula education-to intermediate reading and writing skills in Arabic.  Using various literary and non-literary styles, students will be exposed to functional grammar, sentence structure and paragraph writing. This course is taught in the Arabic language. Students may not enroll and will not receive credit for a language-learning course taken below the level of the language-learning course into which they were tested. Prerequisite: Arabic Admission Placement or Arabic Placement Exam 15 or higher.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 220      Readings in Arabic Heritage             (3) [A], [H]        
This course surveys selections of writings from classical Arabic works. The main aim of the selections is to reflect the intellectual, literary and cultural developments of the Arabs from pre-Islamic times up to the present day. The course is thematically organized to allow students the opportunity to study the continuity or changes of certain values and beliefs in Arabic culture. This course is taught in the Arabic language. Students may not enroll and will not receive credit for a language-learning course taken below the level of the language-learning course into which they were tested. Prerequisite: Arabic Admission Placement or Arabic Placement Exam 25 or higher.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 221       Creative Writing                                   (3)                       
This course introduces students to the skills of writing the genre of the short story and novel. This course is taught in the Arabic language.

ARAB 301       Arabic as a Second Language III      (3) [A]                
This course builds on the earlier Arabic courses for non-native speakers. It uses more advanced materials to strengthen the reading, writing, listening and speaking abilities of the student. This course is taught in the Arabic language. Students may not enroll and will not receive credit for a language-learning course taken below the level of the language-learning course into which they were tested. Prerequisite: ARAB 201.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 303      Literature of the Arabian Gulf           (3) [H], [K]        
This course looks at the contribution of literary figures from the Arabian Gulf, especially those of Kuwait, to Arabic literature in general. This course is taught in the Arabic language. This course satisfies the General Education Requirement for Arabic Culture. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.

ARAB 304      Arabic Drama                                        (3) [H], [K]        

The course looks at the emergence of Arabic drama in the 19th century until the present day, and assesses prototype drama forms of the medieval period.  Through a study of selected plays by prominent authors, a picture will emerge as the influence of Arabic drama on Arabic literature. A selection of video recordings will also accompany the course. This course is taught in the Arabic language. This course satisfies the General Education Requirement for Arabic Culture.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 308      Arab Women in History                       (3) [H]                
An exploration of the diversity of voices of Arab women, both past and present, from a multidisciplinary perspective. Topics include women as revolutionaries and nationalists, male-female relations, women in the workforce, female circumcision, family structures and lifestyles. This course is taught in the Arabic language.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 310       Classical Arabic Prose                         (3) [H], [K]        
This course surveys Classical Arabic prose. The main aim of the selections is to introduce a few of the outstanding literary achievements of the Arabs in prose from the 8th to the 14th centuries. Readings will include works by Ibn al-Muqaffa', al-Jahiz, Ikhwan al-Safa', Badi' al-Zaman al-Hamadhani, and others. This course is taught in the Arabic language. Sophomore standing. Prerequisite: ARAB 220.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 312       Modern Arabic Literature                  (3) [H], [K]        
This course surveys modern and postmodern Arabic creative writing: novel, short story, drama, poetry and literary criticism. Themes in this course include, but are not limited to, love, death, exile, social pressures and political concerns. The course demonstrates the nexus between Arabic literary production and contemporary challenges of Arab life. This course is taught in the Arabic language. This course satisfies the General Education Requirement for Arab Culture. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ARAB 220.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 313       Arab Women and Literature               (3) [H], [K]        
A survey of the history of Arab women's literature, from the medieval period to the present day. Special attention is paid to the questions of literary tradition. This course is taught in the Arabic language. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 314       Classical Arabic Poetry                       (3) [H], [K]        
This course focuses on selected masterpieces of classical Arabic poetry. Individual works are studied with an aim to understanding the historical context of their composition and to appreciating their literary value. This course is taught in the Arabic language. This course satisfies the General Education Requirement for Arab Culture.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite:  ARAB 220.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 315       Literature of Al-Andalus                     (3) [H], [K]        
A survey of poetry and prose from the nearly eight centuries of Arab-Islamic civilization in Al-Andalus. This course is taught in the Arabic language. This course satisfies the General Education Requirement for Arab Culture. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ARAB 220.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 316       Literature in the Abbasid Era            (3) [H], [K]        
This course involves the study of literature in the Abbasid Era, both early and later ages up to the fall of Baghdad in 1258. Through a literary analysis of poetry and prose of the Abbasid period, some of the historical characteristics of the period, as well as the development of music, cuisine and the arts will be highlighted. This course is taught in the Arabic language. Sophomore standing. Prerequisite: ARAB 220.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 318       Modern Arabic Novel                          (3) [H], [K]        
This course focuses on the development of the Arabic novel, and surveys the main factors that led to the rise of the novel. Students will analyze a number of works by prominent Arab novelists: Naguib Mahfouz, Jamal Ghitani, Tayyib Saleh, Ghada Samman, and Ghassan Kanafani. Exile, post-colonialism, feminine discourse will be among the themes discussed. The readings will be supplemented with critical theory by leading Arab literary critics. This course is taught in the Arabic language. Sophomore standing. Prerequisite: ARAB 220.
                                                                                                                    
ARAB 369      Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers.  Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ARAB 388      Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ARAB 389      Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit. Permission of Instructor.


Art (ART)

ART 100         Introduction to Creativity                   (3) [H]                
This course introduces students to a variety of art media including drawing, painting, collage, and sculpture through studio exercises and/or lectures. It focuses on the mental processes involved in the generation of ideas or concepts necessary to develop a student's ability to imagine and construct, that is, to create.
                                                                                                                    
ART 101          Art History I                                          (3) [H]                
A chronological survey highlighting the developments in Western Art from the prehistoric to the early Renaissance.

ART 102         Art History II                                        (3) [H]                
A chronological survey highlighting the developments in Western Art from the Renaissance to the late 20th C.

ART 103         Arab and Islamic Art                           (3) [H], [K]        
A critical survey of the chronological development of Islamic Art. This course satisfies the General Education Requirement for Arab Culture.

 ART 115          Color Theory                                         (3) [H]                
This is an introductory studio course devoted to the development of the perception of color and its use as a tool for artists and designers. The exercises test the appearance of color relationships in complex structures, dealing with meaning and examining the appropriate use of color in the context of design problems. [Cross-listed with GDES 115]
                                                                                                                    
ART 121          Drawing I                                              (3) [H]                
A studio course that introduces drawing materials and methods. Students gain an understanding of the techniques of drawing, including perceptions, shading, line weight, and representation drawing.
                                                                                                                    
ART 122         3-D Design I                                          (3) [H]                
This course is a studio course investigating the basic elements and principles of the visual arts in three dimensional media and form.

ART 201         Art and Society                                      (3) [H]                
Focus on significant artists and artworks in the context of historical periods and requirements of the societies.

ART 205         Contemporary Art                                 (3) [H]                
A study and discussion of current art practices around the world.

ART 211          Cities as Art                                           (3) [H]                
An examination of various historic cities, with a discussion of their history and evolution, important artworks, landmarks, and buildings.

ART 221         Drawing II                                             (3) [H]                
Drawing II is the second of two fundamental drawing courses. It continues the processes and concepts introduced in Drawing I and introduces interpretive approaches to drawing with a growing emphasis on creativity and content. Prerequisite: ART 121.
                                                                                                                    
ART 240         Water-Based Painting I                       (3) [H]                
This course provides a foundation in the practices and materials associated with water-based painting. Working from direct observation as well as expressive and conceptual approaches, students develop an understanding of formal concerns as well as paint manipulation to produce strong representational and/or non-representational painting. Pre-requisite: ART 121.
                                                                                                                    
ART 241         Oil Painting I                                        (3) [H]                
This course provides foundation in the practices and materials associated with painting, and prepares students to work in oil based media.  Working from direct observation, students develop an understanding of formal concerns as well as paint manipulation to produce strong representational and/or non-representational paintings.  Prerequisite: ART 121
                                                                                                                    
ART 340         Water-Based Painting II                     (3) [H]                
This course provides a continuing investigation of the materials, processes and techniques of water-based painting. Students will develop an expanded vocabulary of paint language and increased skill in rendering volume, space, light, color and movement in their work based on observation as well as expressive and conceptual approaches. Prerequisite: ART 240
                                                                                                                    
ART 341         Oil Painting II                                      (3) [H]                
This course provides a continuing investigation of the materials, processes, and techniques of oil painting. Students will develop an expanded vocabulary of paint language and increased skill in rendering volume, space, light, color and movement in their work based on observation. Prerequisite: ART 241
                                                                                                                    
ART 369         Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers.  Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor

ART 388         Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor

ART 389         Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor


Business Ethics and Law (BEAL)

BEAL 369      Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit. Permission of Instructor.

BEAL 388      Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit. Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisite: ENGL 305 or MGMT 305.

BEAL 389      Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with a different topic. Permission of Instructor

BEAL 401      Legal & Ethical Issues in Business  (3)                       
Introduces students to legal concepts, the philosophy of law, ethics, and the functions of the court systems. Surveys business related laws including constitutional law and the law of torts, intellectual property, business entities, and corporations. Course content includes an analysis of ethical reasoning and decision making processes in business settings. Pre- requisite: BUS 210
                                                                                                                    
BEAL 403      Corporate Governance & Ethics        (3)                       
This course seeks to generate a critical understanding of corporate governance; including, government regulatory compliance, the exploitation of legal and regulatory loopholes, business ethics, social auditing, and corporate social responsibility, and the role of these practices in the profitability and sustainability of business. Pre-requisite: ENGL 305 or MGMT 305
                                                                                                                    
BEAL 407      International Business Law                (3)                       

A study of international investment law, the law of international trade, currency exchange and World Trade Organization regulations. Pre-requisite: FINC 341


Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 101        General Biology I                                 (4) [P]                
Part one of a two-semester course.  An in-depth introduction to scientific method, and exploration of study of life from atoms to cellular levels of organization. Emphasis on the cell structure, function, energy and metabolism, genes, evolution and speciation, the origins of life, bacteria, plants and animals.  A required laboratory is part of the course.
                                                                                                                    
BIOL 102       General Biology II                               (4) [P]                
Part two of a two-semester course. Emphasis on the organismal and higher levels of biological organization. The plant and animal diversity, plant and animal form and function, body systems, animal behavior, ecology and conservation of biology. A required laboratory is part of the course. Prerequisite: BIOL 101
                                                                                                                    
BIOL 103       Biology in Everyday Life                    (4) [P]                
An exploration of biological concepts related to everyday life. The student is introduced to the basic principles that govern the biological world. Topics include cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, evolution and diversity of life, plant structure and function, animal anatomy and physiology, and genetics. A required laboratory is part of the course.
                                                                                                                    
BIOL 105       Environmental Science                       (3) [P]                
This introductory course addresses the relationship between human activity and the environment. Emphasis on ecosystems, energy flow and nutrient cycling, populations dynamics, resource use and conservation, pollution, management and eradication of pollution, ethics and the environment.
                                                                                                                    
BIOL 200       Structure and Function of the Human Body                (3) [P]   
A course designed to help students understand the biological basis of human health and disease. Study of cell and molecular biology, physiology, anatomy, reproductive biology, and function of various organs as they relate to humans. Emphasis will be placed on specific topics in human health and disease. Prerequisite: BIOL 101or BIOL 103
                                                                                                                    
BIOL 220       Ecology                                                  (3) [P]                
An examination of the interactions of living organisms with their physical and biological environments.  Special attention will be given to popular dynamics and the interactions among organisms that determine the structure, function, evolutionary development of biological communities, and the ecological role played by man.  Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 103 or BIOL 105
                                                                                                                    
BIOL 317       Introduction to Neurobiology            (3) [P]                
A general introduction to basic anatomy and physiology of the brain. Specific topics include neuronal function, synaptic transmission, sensory processing, movement, sleep and wakefulness, hunger, thirst, caloric and body fluid homeostasis, recovery of function after brain damage, and various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 103
                                                                                                                    
BIOL 369       Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor

BIOL 388       Independent Study                               (1 - 4)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

BIOL 389       Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.


Free Elective Under Any Business & Economics Discipline

BUEL 473      Internship for Free Elective Business                          (1 - 3)    

Supervised experience designed to enhance intellectual development through application of knowledge in an occupation.  Requirements include: weekly journals, and final report explaining what the internship added to the student's knowledge in an approved discipline.  A Pass/No Pass Course requiring Junior Standing and Permission of Instructor.  Pre-requisite: Minimum GPA of 2.00.

Business (BUS)

BUS 100          Introduction to Business                     (3)                       
Business 100 provides an overview of business and the role business plays in economic, social, and political environments. It will also provide exposure to the functional areas of business such as management, operations, marketing, and finance. There will be opportunities to discuss current events in business as they apply to the topics being covered.
                                                                                                                    
BUS 210          Research Methods for Business         (3)                       
This course explains and describes the different aspects and stages of conducting business research. It presents the various analytical frameworks and methodological tools used for this purpose with emphasis on empirical approach, data collection, and analysis. Pre-requisite: MGMT 201 and STAT 201.
                                                                                                                    
BUS 321          International Business                        (3)                       
The course examines integration of economic, political & cultural aspects of business to reveal the impact of globalization on countries, organizations, & individuals. Students develop a world-view of the marketplace, learn how the global environment affects business functions, about ethical issues, social responsibility, investment organizations and technology. Pre-requisite: MGMT 201
                                                                                                                    
BUS 490         Business Administration Capstone    (3)                       
This capstone integrates subject matter from the BBA Core and Major Disciplines. It draws on case studies that illustrate approaches adopted by local, regional and global businesses to meet challenges posed by the dynamic and competitive environment. Students develop skills in, and appreciation of, the interdisciplinary nature of the business management. Pre-requisite: BUS 210 and BUS 321


Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 101     General Chemistry I                            (4) [P]                
This introductory course covers the fundamental chemical principles, concepts and laws. Topics include chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, kinetic theory of fases, thermochemistry, atomic structure and periodicity, the Bohr model, Lewis structures, ionic and covalent bonding, the solid state and crystallography, the liquid state and phase diagrams. Laboratory experiments illustrate principles discussed in the course.  Co-requisite: MATH 201
                                                                                                                    
CHEM 102    General Chemistry II                           (4) [P]                
Continuation of General Chemistry I.  Covers properties of solutions; oxidation-reduction reactions, colligative and chemical properties; acid base and complex ion equlibria, laws of thermodynamics, enthalpy and free energy, electrochemistry, representative elements, transition metals, and nuclear chemistry.  Laboratory includes experiments illustrating principles discussed in the course.  Pre-requisite: CHEM 101
                                                                                                                    
CHEM 103    Chemistry in Everyday Life               (4) [P]                
An introduction to the principles of chemistry and its role in our daily life.  A number of topics will be addressed such as nuclear chemistry and the atomic bomb, acids and bases, petroleum, chemistry in the kitchen, food additives and coloring, perfumes, soaps and detergents, toxins and poisons, medicine and drugs, forensic chemistry and DNA fingerprinting, global warming, acid rain, air and water pollution. A required laboratory is part of the course.
                                                                                                                    
CHEM 105    Environmental Chemistry                  (3) [P]                
A study of the Chemistry of current environmental problems and potential solutions. Topics include water pollution and treatment, air pollution, photochemical smog, hazardous wastes, heavy metal soils, ground level pollution, and toxicology. It also includes issues of the ozone layer, global warming, acid rain, nuclear waste disposal and the problem and treatment of oil spills.
                                                                                                                    
CHEM 388    Independent Study                               (1 - 4)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.


Communication (COMM)

COMM 101    Introduction to Mass Communication                          (3)         
Examines the issues and concepts involved in the initial study of the mass media, (i.e., television, radio, newspapers, magazines and interactive outlets) and how they impact the individual and society.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 110    Introduction to Digital Media Design                          (3)         
Introduces students to  principles of design in digital media. Emphasis is placed on how to use relevant software, including Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. [Cross-listed with GDES 110]
                                                                                                                    
COMM 111    Images in Media                                  (3)                       
The power of images in media is examined through milestones including those in photography, film, video, and interactive media.

COMM 201    Principles of Journalism                     (3)                       
This course introduces students to the tenets of what makes news culture and how the modern journalist is shaped. Students will be introduced to various theoretical and practical matters that impact the journalist and affect the news media and the audience from professional standards and techniques for informing mass audiences; paradigms of reliability, confirmation, completeness in reportorial writing for news media.  Co-requisite or Pre-requisite: COMM 101
                                                                                                                    
COMM 205   Writing for Mass Media                      (3)                       
Explores basic writing principles and techniques for influencing mass audiences. Exposes students to intensive practice in writing for various groups, including political, civic, and business organizations. Pre-requisite: ENGL 101
                                                                                                                    
COMM 208   Film Production I                                 (3)                       
Introduces students to basics of cinematic storytelling through narrative genres and documentaries. Examines the basics of script-writing, directing, cinematography, and editing. Develops skills in all areas of the craft, and explores both the creative and the technical aspects of production. Includes a short project. Familiarizes students with the nature of filmmaking through lectures and working experiments with traditional narrative filmmaking, documentary, and new media.  [Cross-listed with GDES 208].
                                                                                                                    
COMM 210    Research Methods in Communication                          (3)         
Introduces students to social science research methods within a mass communication context. It emphasizes the scientific method and surveys basic concepts of theoretical and empirical research. Covers a variety of methodologies, elementary statistics and criteria for adequate research. Pre-requisites: COMM 101.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 225   Theories of Communication               (3)                       
A basic theory course for communications and media studies. Introduces prevailing communication theories, including agenda setting, uses and gratification, and diffusion constructs. Prerequisite ENGL 101 and COMM 101
                                                                                                                    
COMM 230   Principles of Advertising                    (3)                       
Provides students with an analysis of commercial advertising from a global perspective with attention to communication theory. Students will examine the structure of advertising messages, how they are adapted to specific audiences, and the social settings in which they occur. Issues of Internet advertising and e-commerce will be explored. Pre-requisites: COMM 101
                                                                                                                    
COMM 240   Principles of Public Relations           (3)                       
Surveys the fundamentals and techniques involved in public relations operations, including the history, philosophy and ethics of the practice and functions of management, planning, research and communication. It explores the theoretical and practical applications of public relations in contemporary society. Pre-requisites: COMM 101
                                                                                                                    
COMM 309   Film Production II                               (3)                       
The course emphasizes the artistic film movement, the role of the American cinema, and its mark on the world. Explores the old and the new Hollywood and the relationships between aesthetics and expenses.  Students will explore the Preproduction, the Production, and the Postproduction phases of filmmaking.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisite: COMM 208 or GDES 208.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 310    Broadcast Journalism                          (3)                       
Introduces students to the principles of broadcast journalism as it occurs in radio and TV. The course includes discussions of technical, ethical, and legal issues affecting broadcast news, as well as lab / studio practice in writing, editing, producing and reporting broadcast stories. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisite: COMM 201
                                                                                                                    
COMM 312    News Reporting and Editing             (3)                       
Explores and practices the skills of a working journalist. Students will build on what is being taught in COMM 201 and apply that knowledge to this class. Emphasis will be on the reporting, writing and the editing of features, hard news stories, broadcast copy, and writing for the Web. There will also be a focus on practical and professional-based skills such as reporting beats and newsroom procedures.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisite: COMM 201 or COMM 205.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 313    Documentary Production                    (3)                       
Introduces students to the concepts of creating a documentary. Emphasis on the practice of documentary production through creation of short or/and semester long productions. Interviewing, shooting, lighting, framing and various narrative techniques are explored. Prerequisite: COMM 201 or COMM 208
                                                                                                                    
COMM 320   Mass Media Law                                  (3)                       
Examines the law as it affects the mass media. Discusses such areas as libel, privacy, public records, criminal pretrial publicity, freedom of information and obscenity.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: COMM 101.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 325   Mass Communication and Society     (3)                       
Provides students with an overview of the effect of media on culture and society.  The course explores how media reflect and mold culture. It examines the role the media play in creating the global village. It also examines how the audience uses and is used by various media outlets and how that use affects the perception of various cultures. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: COMM 101.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 328   Media and Democratization               (3)                       
Media's role in processes of democratization in Europe, Asia, and the Americas.  Current debates and initiatives to make mass media systems more democratic.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: COMM 101.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 332   Writing/Editing Opinion Edit          (3)                       
Principles of writing editorials and opinion columns; policies and practices of opinion writing in mass media; reviews; analysis of editorials, Op-Ed and other commentary. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: COMM 201
                                                                                                                    
COMM 333   Writing Speeches and Delivery         (3)                       
The preparation and delivery of speeches and presentations, from research and writing to practical delivery. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 108.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 338   Copywriting for Advertising              (3)                       
Explores issues, strategies, theories, and practices in writing and editing advertising messages. Teaches the technical aspects of advertising: writing advertising copy and designing effective layouts. Students use their software design skills. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: COMM 230.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 350   Organizational Communication and Leadership        (3)         
Teaches students the role of communication in creating a productive organizational environment in terms of interpersonal and group behavior. Reviews the theory and practice of team building, conflict resolution and problem solving and explores how communication and organizational cultures relate to each other. Cross-listed with MGMT 350.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: COMM 101 or MGMT 201.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 360   Public Relations Writing                    (3)                       
Introduces the student to the essentials of how to prepare and present written material for use in the practice of public relations. It teaches the student the techniques needed for creating effective written communication at a standard generally expected of persons entering into the practice of public relations.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: COMM 240.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 369   Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

COMM 370   Political Communication                    (3)                       
Political communication is fundamental to the political sphere. This course will introduce students to established routines in current contemporary political communication and election campaigns. Case studies from the US, UK, and other countries will be examined in institutional and cultural contexts that influence the processes of political communication. Junior standing.  Prerequisites: COMM 101.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 375   Rhetorics of Cultural Dissonance      (3)                       
This course examines the ways in which language creates, reflects, and transforms cultural identity and beliefs and, consequently, our understanding of local and global relations of power. Through analyses of the various expressive contexts from which ideas about identity and culture emerge, students will develop a greater understanding of the origins and contemporary manifestations of conflict between and within "East" and "West" and "North" and "South."   Cross-listed with ENGL 375.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 380   Media Translation                               (3)                       
The course teaches the various theories and practical skills and techniques of translating, subtitling and dubbing media materials, particularly television programs. The course involves education and training based on TV materials related to Media, Economics, Politics, Law, Business, Literature, Culture, Medicine and Science. Cross-listed with TRAN 380. Sophomore Standing

COMM 388   Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

COMM 389   Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

COMM 402   PR Campaigns                                      (3)                       
Capstone for public relations students. Class functions as a full-service public relations firm. The aim is to have students embark on a semester-long corporate communications project using all the relevant skills gained in other COMM and similar courses. Emphasis is given to advanced public relations writing skills aimed at creating, implementing, and machining positive corporate public image. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: COMM 240.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 405   International Mass Communication (3)                       
Examines world mass media systems: what they are like; how they operate; what impact they have on people; what policies are and could be used by the various countries to develop or regulate them; and how they are influenced by a country's political, economic, social and cultural make-up. Junior standing. Prerequisite: COMM 101.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 410    New Media and Society                      (3)                       
The rise and diffusion of new media had a profound impact on society. The course explains the complex relationship between new media and social change and looks at how communication theory is impacted by the changing media environment.  Junior standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: COMM 101.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 420   Editing and Editorial Policies          (3)                       
Fundamental principles and practices of editing, copy editing, wire editing, deadline writing, and editorial judgment; editorial policy; introduction to newspaper design and layout. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: COMM 320 or COMM 312.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 422   Writing/Edit Feature Articles           (3)                       
Practices advanced writing and editing of feature stories. Instruction will also be given on developing stories through research, interviewing, and writing, followed by marketing and publication of stories. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: COMM 312.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 425   International Case Studies in Public Relations           (3)         
Exposes students to major issues in public relations, with a focus on the characteristics of successful cases in PR. The class lays the theoretical foundation for comparative analysis of public relations practice around the world and then examines national and regional examples. Junior Standing.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 427   Media and Arab Society                      (3)                       
A survey of the histories, roles, and institutions of media in Arab countries from printing to electronic media, from major publishing firms and publications to satellites and satellite broadcasters, including the Internet and publications in that medium. Junior Standing. Prerequisites: COMM 101.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 430   Oral History                                          (3)                       
A seminar that critically examines current issues via the method of oral history. Additionally, this seminar will enable students to apply methods of research and analysis from various university programs as they prepare for and analyze interviews. The course will involve participation in at least two oral history projects over the course of the semester. Cross-listed with HIST 430. Prerequisites: COMM 101 or any HIST 100 or 200 level courses or AMST 121 or INST 204 or INST 205.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 455   Advertising Media Planning             (3)                       
Examines media planning, buying, and sales as performed by advertising agencies, clients, and media. Students learn how to evaluate and select advertising media for various market situations. Examines target audience, media characteristics and data sources. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: COMM 230.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 460   Advertising Campaigns                       (3)                       
Capstone for Advertising students. Class functions as a full-service advertising agency. Using all the relevant skills gained in other COMM and similar courses, students collaborate on a semester-long project that includes the conception, research, development, and execution of real-life advertising campaigns. Special emphasis is given to advanced copywriting, as well as to layout and production concerns for print, broadcast, and new media.  Junior standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: COMM 230
                                                                                                                    
COMM 470   Internship in Communication            (1 - 3)                  
Students gain practical experience in the field. A weekly log accounting for activities required. Three credits are equivalent to 120 hours of internship. This is a Pass/Fail course. Junior standing and Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
COMM 480   Seminar in Communication                (3)                       
Junior class standing and Permission of Instructor.


Computer Engineering (CPEG)

CPEG 201      Matlab Programming                          (3)                       
Matlab and its application for engineering analysis and problem solving. Command Window Operations, 2D plotting, Array Manipulation, Data Handling, Control Structures, Scripting and Function Files, 3D plotting; numerical methods, roots of nonlinear equations, systems of equations, differential equations, etc. Building Graphical User Interfaces. Simulink: Introduction to Model-based Design, Matlab Toolboxes. Co-requisite MATH 210 Prerequisite: CSIS 120.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 210      Digital Logic Design                           (4)                       
Number systems and codes, Boolean algebra, minimization methods, combinational circuit design and analysis, arithmetic blocks, programmable logic, latches and flip-flops, sequential logic design, state machines, registers, counters, memory elements, logic synthesis, high-level synthesis, an introduction to VHDL. A lab component is included in this course. Prerequisite: CSIS 120.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 220      Computer Organization and Architecture                   (3)         
The fundamental elements of digital logic and their use in computer construction; register level description of computer execution and the functional organization of a computer; essential elements of computer architecture; major functional components of a modern computer system. Design principles associated with modern computer architectures; performance and cost considerations; architectural features influenced by such features as operating systems and window systems, high level languages, etc.; floating point arithmetic, performance of computer systems, processor implementation strategies, micro-programming, pipelining, CISC and RISC, vector processors; memory hierarchy, cache, virtual memory organization for high performance machines; An brief introduction to I/O and bus subsystems. Prerequisite: CPEG 210.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 330      Microprocessors & Interfacing         (4)                       
Microprocessor organization, multicore processors, programming model, assembly language programming, addressing modes, translating high-level programs to assembly language, arithmetic/logic operations, selection, looping, pointers, subroutines/macros, etc. I/O and buses, protocols, modern interfacing techniques, interfacing ICs, applications of microprocessors and microcontrollers, and software/hardware interface design; a lab component is included in this course. Prerequisites: CPEG 220 and ELEG 270.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 340      Embedded System Design                  (3)                       
System design process: requirements analysis, specification, hardware/software co-design, testing; embedded computing platforms: general-and special-purpose processors, hardware accelerators, systems-on-a-chip, intellectual property (IP) core-based design; software design tools and technologies: CAD tools, compilers, and assemblers; hardware design tools and technologies: hardware-description languages, high-level synthesis tools, ASIC and FPGA design. Prerequisite: CPEG 220.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 369      Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester.  Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

CPEG 388      Independent Study                               (1 - 4)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

CPEG 389      Special Topics in Computer Engineering                    (3)         
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

CPEG 422      Digital Signal Processing                   (3)                       
Digital processing of signals, sampling, difference equations, discrete-time Fourier transforms, discrete and fast Fourier transforms, digital filter design. Signal Processing under MATLAB. Pre-requisites ELEG 320 Signals and Systems.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 441      Hardware/Software Co-Design         (3)                       
Design models: state machines, concurrent process models, dataflow, communicating sequential processes, etc. Design portioning, co-synthesis, co-stimulation, co-design. Transformational co-design, formal models, correctness. Functional programming in HW design, concurrency, synthesis of parallel algorithms. HW Compilers. Prerequisite: CPEG 340.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 450      Network Security                                 (3)                       
Fundamental security principles and real-world applications of Internet and computer security.  Topics covered in the course include legal and privacy issues, risk analysis, attack and intrusion detection concepts, system log analysis, intrusion detection and packet filtering techniques, computer security models, computer forensics, and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks.  Junior standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: CSIS 322.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 455      Wireless Networks and Mobile Systems         (3)
Multidisciplinary, project-oriented design course that considers aspects of wireless and mobile systems.  Including wireless networks and link protocols, mobile networking including support for the Internet Protocol suite, mobile middleware, and mobile applications.  Junior standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: CSIS 322.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 460      Robotics        (3)                       
Project-oriented design course that includes topics on perception, sensors, computer vision, navigation, localization, actuation, manipulation, mobility. Intelligence: control, planning, and mission execution. Junior standing. Prerequisites: CPEG 330 and ELEG 320.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 470      Internship in Computer Engineering            (1 - 3)    
An Internship experience with the requirement that the student write a report summarizing what the internship job added to his or her knowledge of computer engineering and related fields.  Students are limited to a maximum of 6 internship credit hours.  This is a Pass/Fail course. Junior standing and Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: A Minimum Grade Point Average of 2.0.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 475      Senior Design Capstone I        (3)                       
A supervised project in groups of normally three students aimed at providing practical experience in some aspect of computer engineering.  Students are expected to complete a literature survey, project specification, critical analysis, and to acquire the necessary material needed for their intended end product. Requires Senior standing and Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
CPEG 480      Senior Design Capstone II                  (3)                       
A course that seeks to impart in students the skill to integrate the knowledge gained in different courses by asking them to develop a product that has passed through the design, analysis, testing, and evaluation stages. This course includes production of a professional report, design process and outcome, implementation and testing, and critical appraisal of the project. Prerequisite: CPEG 475.


Computer Science & Information Systems (CSIS)

CSIS 101         Computer and Information Systems  (3) [T]                
An introduction to the use of computers.  The hardware and system software of computers are described.  Commonly-used software applications (word processing, spread sheets, databases, etc.) as well as communication (e-mail, World Wide Web, etc.) are reviewed and discussed.  Students will have extensive hands-on training during supervised laboratory sessions.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 110         Information Systems                            (3) [T]                
An overview of information systems.  Topics include: computer hardware, operating systems, databases, telecommunications and networks, Internet, information systems software, designing information systems, applications and artificial intelligence.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 120         Computer Programming I                  (4) [T]                
This course examines the fundamental programming constructs of an Object Oriented Language, Java: data types, variables, operators, expressions and statements, conditional and iterative control structures, classes, objects and methods.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 130         Computer Programming II                 (4) [T]                
This course builds upon the material presented in CSIS120 and introduces more advanced Object-Oriented programming concepts and implementation details. Topics include: inheritance and polymorphism, exception handling, dynamic data structures, File I/O, and graphical user interfaces. Pre-requisite:  CSIS 120
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 150         Professional and Ethical Issues in CSIS                       (3) [T]   
Legal, ethical, privacy, and security issues in Computer usage. Group work, student presentations, discussions, and student essays addressing the above issues. Case studies relating to computer ethics will be discussed. Pre-requisite:  CSIS 110 or CSIS 120
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 210         Data Structures and Algorithms        (3)                       
The study of fundamental data structures, algorithms and their applications.  Topics include lists and trees; queues and stacks, sort and search techniques; analysis and design of efficient algorithms; Recursion. Pre-requisites: CSIS 130
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 220         Computer Architecture and Assembly Language       (3)         
An introduction to digital computer hardware architecture and organization. Topics include digital logic, processor design, instruction sets, and system architecture. Programs written in assembly language will be used to gain hands-on experience with the underlying system architecture. Prerequisite: CSIS 130.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 230         Programming in a Second Language                            (3)         
An introduction to a second computer programming Language. Students learn to read and write program in a second language. The language chosen is one with wide popularity and use. Prerequisite:  CSIS 130
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 250         Database Systems                                 (3)                       
An introduction to database concepts, database advantages and users, data independence relational data model, object oriented model, database design by analysis and synthesis, relational algebra, data definition and manipulation languages, semantic integrity constraints, semantic query transformation and optimization. Prerequisite: CSIS 130.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 255         Web Technologies                                (3)                       
This course focuses on building Web applications and their associated technologies.  Client and server languages, professional website development tools, databases on the web, and web servers.  Students are expected to complete a project in the development and maintenance of web sites as well as web services. Prerequisite: CSIS 130.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 260         System Analysis and Design               (3)                       
Study of the principles, tools and practices of information systems analysis. Emphasis on learning pragmatic aspects of working as a system analyst and employing the tools of systems analysis and design. Prerequisites: CSIS 210.

CSIS 300         E-Commerce                                         (3)                       
This course focuses on the evolution of electronic commerce where business is conducted between organizations and individuals relying primarily on digital media and transmission. Participants investigate the opportunities and challenges of exchanging goods and services over communications networks as well as the manner in which relationships are being reshaped. New forms of business arrangements are also examined. Course activities are designed to provide both managerial and entrepreneurial assessments of anticipated advances in information technology with respect to business systems and electronic markets.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: CSIS 250
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 310         Introduction to Operating Systems   (3)                       
Study of supervisory programs. System services and file systems; CPU scheduling; memory management; virtual memory; disk scheduling. Deadlock characterization, prevention, and avoidance; concurrent processes; semaphores; critical sections; synchronization. Distributed systems and communication protocols. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite:  CSIS 210.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 320         Principles of Programming Languages                       (3)         
Formal definition of programming languages including specification of syntax and semantics. A survey of programming paradigms (procedural, functional, and logic). History of programming languages, data types supported, control structures and run time management of dynamic structures. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: CSIS 210.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 322         Computer Networks                             (3)                       
This course covers the fundamental concepts of computer networks. Topics include: OSI model; LAN/WAN architecture and design; network services and protocols such as TCP/IP, mobile IP; DNS, ICMP, telnet, ftp, etc.; distributed object systems; and collaboration technology and groupware. Students are expected to complete a project that covers the essentials of setup, configuration and administration of multi-protocol servers and clients. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: CSIS 210.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 330         Software Engineering                         (3)                       
An introduction to the software development cycle (analysis, design, coding, testing and maintenance) and contemporary software development methods. This course places special emphasis on object-oriented systems. Students are expected to complete a medium-scale software project. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: CSIS 210.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 369         Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with difference topic. Permission of Instructor.

CSIS 370         Computer Graphics                              (3)                       
Detailed study of two-dimensional graphics and introduction to issues from three-dimensional graphics. Graphics hardware and applications. Study of graphics primitives into two dimensions: lines, attributes, windowing, clipping, transformations.  Overview of other topics: three-dimensional transformations, modeling, color science, rendering. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: CSIS 210 and MATH 201.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 388         Independent Study                               (1 - 4)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

CSIS 389         Special Topics in Computer Science (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

CSIS 390         Special Topics in Information Systems                         (3)         
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

CSIS 400         Theory of Computation                        (3)                       
Abstract models of computers (finite automata, pushdown automata, and turning machines) and the language classes they recognize or generate (regular, context-free, and recursively enumerable) Church's thesis, decidability, the halting problem, and computability. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: CSIS 210.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 405         Analysis of Algorithms                        (3)                       
Covers algorithmic analysis and strategies, advanced searching and sorting algorithms, hashing, graph and spanning trees algorithms, topological sort, complexity, approximation algorithms, and basic computability theory. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: CSIS 210 and MATH 201.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 415         Artificial Intelligence                         (3)                       
Introduction to the types of problems and techniques in Artificial Intelligence; problem-solving methods. Major structures used in Artificial Intelligence programs. Study of knowledge representation techniques, problem-solving through problem decomposition and interaction through subparts. Neural Networks and Heuristic programming. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite CSIS 210 and MATH 213.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 416         Expert Systems                                     (3)                       
Introduces the basic concepts, techniques and tools involved in the development of information systems based on human expertise.  It includes: identification of expert systems, knowledge acquisition, and architecture of expert systems, inference, verification and validation of expert systems.  Prerequisite: CSIC 415
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 425         Advanced Software Engineering       (3)                       
Advanced Object Oriented topics will be covered: design patterns, testing, project management, distributed systems, metrics, and survey of OO programming languages.

CSIS 440         Software Project Management           (3)                       
Study of project management in the context of software systems development. The course will cover the processes, contexts, metrics, planning, and management concerns of projects for modern software systems. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: CSIS 330.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 470         Practicum in Computing & Information Systems       (1 - 3)    
An internship experience with the requirement that the student write a report summarizing what the internship job added to his or her knowledge of computer science. This is a Pass/Fail course. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CSIS 475         Compiler Construction                        (3)                       
Principles and practices in the design of compilers. Introduction to formal languages. Lexical analysis and syntax analysis. Top-down and bottom-up parsing. Syntax directed translation and syntax trees. Intermediate forms, symbol tables, and code generation. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: CSIS 320.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 490         Computer Science and Information Systems Capstone I           (3)      
This course integrates core topics of the computer science body of knowledge, teamwork, and professional practices through the implementation of a large-scale project. Senior standing. Prerequisite: CSIS 330.
                                                                                                                    
CSIS 491         Computer Science and Information Systems Capstone II         (3)      
This course integrates core topics of the computer science body of knowledge, teamwork, and professional practices through the implementation of a large-scale project. Senior standing. Prerequisite: CSIS 490.


Drama (DRAM)

DRAM 101     Introduction to Theatre History        (3) [H]                
A comprehensive introduction of western theatre history from Ancient Greek Comedy and Tragedy to modern American and English drama.

DRAM 150     Introduction  to Acting                        (3) [H]                
An introductory course into acting focusing on terminology, movement, and various contemporary western acting methods.

DRAM 211     Contemporary Theatre                        (3) [H]                
Survey course designed to familiarize the student with contemporary works of dramatic literature works from 1879 to the present.

DRAM 212     Ancient Greek Theatre                        (3) [H]                
An in-depth survey course of the dramatic writings of the Ancient Greek world, this course will acquaint the student with some of the first works of the Western civilization.

DRAM 213     Shakespeare for Beginners                 (3) [H]                
A broad survey course of selected scenes and other material from the dramatic works of William Shakespeare.

DRAM 250     Acting I                                                  (3) [H]                
A continuation of Intro to Acting, with a focus on the Stanislovsky method and Chekhov.  Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: DRAM 150.

DRAM 350     Shakespeare in Performance              (3) [H]                
An exploration into Shakespeare's prose and poetry through text and performance. Text analysis and scansion techniques will be discussed as well as sonnet composition. Sophomore standing.
                                                                                                                    
DRAM 360     Theater Production                              (3) [H]                
Faculty directed theater production. Specific dramatic material will vary. Students may participate in acting, stage management, dramaturgy, assistant direction, design (costume/ lighting/ scenic), or as other production staff. Sophomore standing and Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
DRAM 369     Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

DRAM 388     Independent Study                               (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

DRAM 389     Special Topics                                       (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit. Permission of Instructor.


Economics (ECON)

ECON 101      Introduction to Contemporary Economic Issues         (3)         
Introduction to fundamental concepts of micro- and macro-economics and the tools that are generally used to analyze current business and economic issues.

ECON 200     Principles of Microeconomics           (3)                       
An introduction to microeconomics. The course focuses on supply, demand and product markets, production costs and pricing and output under different market structures. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or 103 or 110.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 201     Principles of Macroeconomics          (3)                       
An introduction to macroeconomics.  The course focuses on national income and product accounts, consumption, investment, international trade, and output.  It also provides students with a theoretical basis in macroeconomics, introduces them to the use of Macro models in a real-world context.  Topics covered include the nature of risk and its impact, the use of forecasts, the volatility of foreign exchange markets, and the role of fiscal and monetary policy in stabilizing the economy. Co-requisite or Pre-requisite: ECON 200
                                                                                                                    
ECON 209     Math & Stats for Econ & Business    (3)                       
The course focuses on different mathematical applications and statistical techniques such as basic algebra, system of linear equations, developing and testing of hypothesis using correlation and regression. It enables students to apply different quantitative methods to solve economics and business related problems. Prerequisite: STAT 201; MATH 103 or MATH 110.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 300     Intermediate Microeconomics           (3)                       
Mathematically-based theory of relative prices of commodities and services under perfect and imperfect competition; theory of the firm; consumer demand. Pre-requisite: ECON 200 and ECON 201 and ECON 209.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 301     Intermediate Macroeconomics          (3)                       
Mathematically-based theory and concepts of national income determination, employment and economic growth. Prerequisites:  ECON 201 and ECON 209.

ECON 304     Economics of Labor                             (3)                       
The application of economic theory to current labor problems, domestic and foreign. Problems include wage theory and wage differentials, training policy, poverty, unemployment and underemployment, migration, discrimination, issues of productivity, industrialization and union policies. Prerequisite: ECON 200 and ECON 201.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 305     International Economics                    (3)                       
Theories and concepts of international trade; real flows; terms of trade; industry structure and resource differences; international competitiveness; the effects of international trade on the economies of importing and exporting countries; the effects of tariffs and quotas and other nontariff barriers on international trade.  Also includes multinational corporations, trade and development, customs, and unions. Prerequisites: ECON 200 and ECON 201.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 315     Managerial Economics                       (3)                       
The course focuses on the application of the concepts of economics to managerial issues.  It integrates economic principles with modern management techniques and theory for the purpose of efficient managerial decision-making. Topics include optimization techniques, demand estimation, production and cost analysis, alert structure, and pricing practices. Prerequisites: ECON 201; ECON 200; and ECON 209.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 351     Money and Banking                             (3)                       
Analysis of capital markets and the role of banks, and other financial institutions in the economy.   Prerequisites: ECON 200 and ECON 201.

 ECON 363     Environmental & Natural Resource Economics         (3)         
An introductory course in the environmental and natural resource economics, it is designed to help students explore the important role of economics in the design and implementation of policy and management of natural and environmental resources.  Prerequisites: ECON 200 and ECON 201.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 369     Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers.  Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ECON 388     Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Independent study by student with the requirement that the student writes a report summarizing the knowledge acquired during the period of study. Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisite: ECON 209.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 389     Special Topics                                       (3)                       
An analysis of contemporary issues in economic theory. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisites: ECON 200 and ECON 201.

ECON 405     Comparative Economic Systems        (3)                       
A theoretical and historical evaluation of different economic systems, planning strategies and their effects on economic growth, democracy, equity and effectiveness; assessment of the historical experience of the formerly socialist economies; distinctive features of European and Japanese economies and Third World societies. Prerequisites: ECON 200 and ECON 201.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 409     Economic Development                      (3)                       
Theories and policies of economic development; role of international institutions; impact of international trade policy, international capital flows, exchange rate policies, inflation, public finance, monetary policy, competitiveness, military expenditures; agriculture, population, and the environment.  Prerequisites: ECON 200 and ECON 201.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 429     Environmental and Energy Policy   (3)                       
The course will examine the principles, policy instruments, and current practice of using economics to analyze various environmental and natural resource problems, especially the economics of energy. It focuses on the study of environmental protection, evaluation of environmental costs and benefits, and optimal management of energy resources. Prerequisites: ECON 200 and ECON 201.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 452     Econometrics                                        (3)                       
Review of econometric statistics and statistical techniques;  the application of statistical models to economic data; regression analysis and estimation of economic models; the question of violations of the basic assumptions of the regression model, dummy variables and analysis of variance; index numbers and time series analysis. Pre-requisites ECON 300 and ECON 301.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 470     Internship in Economics                    (1 - 3)                  
An Internship experience with the requirement that the student write a report or summarizing what the internship job added to his/her knowledge of economics and related fields. Students are limited to a maximum of 3 internship credit hours. This is Pass/Fail course. Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
ECON 485     Seminar in Economics                         (3)                       
A seminar for seniors; majors conduct research projects on varying relevant economic issues; presentation of research approaches, subjects and results; a group project and an individual research project may be allowed. Topics and Instructor may vary. Senior standing.


Education (EDUC)

EDUC 100      Essentials of Learning                        (2) [L]                
The course consists of modules that direct students in a methodical way through a sequence of active learning strategies.  Several self-discovery units will lead students through practical activities which are designed to enhance their personal growth and development as active learners.  Specifically, the course work is designed to provide students with tools to be successful as lifelong learners.
                                                                                                                    
EDUC 389     Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.


Electrical Engineering (ELEG)

ELEG 220     Electric Circuits                                   (4)                       
Introduction to the basic laws and techniques for electric circuits analysis, response of circuits with resistors, independent sources, controlled sources, operational amplifiers; Transient analysis of basic circuits with R, L, and C components. AC analysis and phasors; An Introduction to Matlab. A lab component is included in this course. Co-requisite MATH 210 and Prerequisite: PHYS 116.
                                                                                                                    
ELEG 270     Electronics                                            (4)                       
Introduction to the basic electronic devices including diodes and transistors and their operating principles.  Analysis of electronic circuits operating under dc bias and switching conditions.  Applications of devices in digital electronic circuits.  Prerequisite: ELEG 220.
                                                                                                                    
ELEG 320     Signals & Systems                                (3)                       
Signals (functions of one or more independent variables) and Systems (devices that perform operations on signals) presents fundamental concepts that arise in a variety of fields.  The ideas and techniques associated with these concepts inform such diverse disciplines as biomedical engineering, acoustics, communications, aeronautics and astronautics, circuit design, and the arts, humanities, and social sciences.  Topics include transforms (Z, Laplace, Fourier), frequency analysis, convolution, FIR and IIR systems, stability, generalized functions, modulation (AM and FM), sampling, and digital filtering.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Pre-requisite: ELEG 220.
                                                                                                                    
ELEG 369     Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester.  Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ELEG 388     Independent Study                               (1 - 4)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ELEG 389     Special Topics in Electrical Engineering                   (3)         
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ELEG 421      Control Systems                                    (3)                       
Control Systems. Advantages of closed-loop feedback systems. System representations using mathematical models block diagrams & signal flow graphs. Poles and zeros. P, Pl & PID controllers. System design & stability. Frequency response techniques, Root-locus, & Bode-plot analysis. Basic lead-lag compensation. Control systems under MATLAB. Prerequisite: ELEG 320.
                                                                                                                    
ELEG 470     Internship in Electrical Engineering                          (1 - 3)    
An Internship experience with the requirement that the student write a report summarizing what the internship job added to his or her knowledge of Electrical Engineering and related fields.  Students are limited to a maximum of 6 internship credit hours.  This is a pass/fail course. Junior standing and Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: A Minimum Grade Point Average of 2.0.

English Language & Literature (ENGL)

ENGL 100     Fundamentals of Reading and Writing                         (4)         
English 100 is an intensive course designed to help prepare students for the reading and writing activities necessary for success in the academic environment and beyond.  Under the close supervision of the instructor and using the workshop method, students will refine their reading, vocabulary, and sentence skills while producing a portfolio of multi-paragraph writings that demonstrate their ability to summarize, paraphrase, synthesize, analyze, and evaluate information and ideas taken from a variety of sources.  The course meets 20 hours per week.  Exit exam required. Credit earned cannot be used for graduation. Successful completion of this course will prepare students for entry to English 101. Pre-requisite: TOEFL 520 or Accuplacer LOEP Reading, 109/WritePlacer Essay 8 (12 Credit Hours)
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 101      Approaches to Critical Reading and Writing              (3) [E]   
This course focuses on writing and reading for various academic and public purposes and audiences. Students will develop analytical, critical, and argumentative thinking, reading, and writing abilities, and will be introduced to research practices. Prerequisites:  Composite score of  70 or above on TOFEL (IBT) and with score of 21 or above on reading and 22 or above on writing, OR score of  80 or higher on the Accuplacer reading exam and a score of 6 or higher on the Accuplacer essay exam OR successful completion of Level 3 (IEP)
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 102     Writing and Information Literacy     (3) [E]                
This course introduces students to the academic, intellectual, and public activities of research. Through a focus on research as a process of inquiry generated by particular purposes, audiences, and contexts, students will develop a more complex understanding of multiple research processes and genres. Students will formulate their own critical analysis of and response to a range of academic and public issues. Students will develop and conduct an extended research inquiry. The primary aim of this course is to develop students' critical and information literacy. Prerequisite: ENGL 101
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 108     Public Speaking                                   (3) [C]                
This course focuses on the principles of public speaking in large and small group environments with emphasis on audience analysis, research and evidence,    reasoning, rhetoric, organization and delivery. Through analyzing professional speeches and their effectiveness, the student practices the more common speech types: informative, persuasive, special occasion and impromptu.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 201     World Literatures in Translation I    (3) [H]                
This course focuses on world literatures written in languages other than English from antiquity to the 15th century.  The course may include works such as The Epic of Gilgamesh, Homer's Odyssey, The Thousand and One Nights, or Murasaki Shikibu's The Tale of Genji.  Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 203     World Literatures in Translation II  (3) [H]                
This course focuses on world literatures written in languages other than English from the 16th century to the present.  The course may include works such as Cervantes' Don Quixote, Cao Xueqin's Deam of the Red Chamber, Tolstoy's The Death of Ivan Ilyich, or Naguib Mahfouz's Midaq Alley.  Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 207     Introduction to Rhetorical Studies    (3) [H]                
A study of rhetoric from its roots in the classical world to its many variations over time and culture.  Central to the course will be the role of rhetoric in determining the multiple ways in which discourse is constructed to achieve specific ends.  Prerequisites: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 211      World Literatures in English I          (3) [H]                
This course will examine the body of literatures written in English, including and going beyond the British and American canons, in order to ground the study of these canons in the context of a world Anglophone literature. This course will begin with the Middle Ages and progress through the late 18th century, including early Anglophone writings from various regions of the world. This course often includes works such as Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, Milton's Paradise Lost, and Swift's Gulliver's Travels. Prerequisite ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 212     World Literatures in English II        (3) [H]                
This course will examine the body of literatures written in English, including and going beyond the British and American canons, in order to ground the study of these canons in the context of a world Anglophone literature. This course will cover material from the early 19th century to the current day, and include literary works such as Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Achebe's Things Fall Apart, and Joyce's The Dubliners. Prerequisite ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 300     History of the English Language      (3) [H]                
The structure of present day English is radically different from that of Old and Middle English. This course explores the stages through which the English language has evolved to reach its present form. This course will also examine the structure and social meanings of colonial varieties of English. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 301     Literature and Film                             (3) [H]                
This course will involve viewing a variety of films and critical responses to those films. Students will demonstrate in their own written and oral responses to film their ability to use effectively the critical language and methodology of professional film criticism in its varied aesthetic, historical and ideological forms. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 303     English Poetry and Prose: 1500-1660                             (3) [H]  
Examination of Renaissance poetry and prose, not including Shakespeare; Renaissance literature and its impact on the "modern world."  Review and evaluation of the works of Sidney, More, Bacon, Marlowe, Johnson, Donne, and Milton. Also includes selections from the King James Bible for students of literature. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 304     English Poetry and Prose: 1660-1800                             (3) [H]  
The English Enlightenment; the Restoration and the Age of Reason figures including Dryden, Swift, Pope and Johnson. The rise of technology and technological culture and the impact of science and scientific methodology on Enlightenment literature.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 305     Professional Writing and Communication                   (3) [H]  
This course explores professional approaches to communication in today's global business environment.  It also focuses on principles and practices needed for effective internal and external business communication (memos, letters, reports, proposals and presentations).  Students learn to write successful business reports and communications.  Also, students evaluate case studies in business and use appropriate style-guides to document sources.  Cross-listed with MGMT 305.  Prerequisite: ENGL 102.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 307     Shakespeare                                           (3) [H]                
An introduction to Shakespeare: intensive study of selected comedies, tragedies, history plays, and Shakespeare's poetry. Works are discussed in their socio-historical context. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 308     Early American Literature                 (3) [H]                
A historical study of American literary forms and intellectual life, writers and their contributions from the Seventeenth Century world of the Puritans to the work of the early Transcendentalists in the Nineteenth Century. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 309     Nineteenth Century British Literature                         (3) [H]  
This course will examine major British literary texts from the Romantic and Victorian eras, including poetry and prose by Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron, Coleridge, Keats, Mary Shelley, Wollstonecraft, Ruskin, Eliot, Austen, Wilde, Tennyson, the Brontës, Dickens, Arnold, Hemans, Browning, Mill, and Carlyle. The course presents the relationship between each author's works and various historical and cultural developments, such as the industrial revolution and colonialism. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite:  ENGL 101
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 310     Nineteenth Century American Literature                    (3) [H]  
This course will examine major American literary texts written by American writers of the nineteenth century, including poetry and prose by Emerson, Poe, Dickinson, Thoreau, Stowe, Melville, Chopin, Whitman, Cooper, Douglass, Jacobs, Twain, Hawthorne, and other writers concerned with issues of gender, race, and social justice. The course presents the relationship between each author and his/her works and various historical and cultural developments, such as the Civil War and Abolition and Suffrage. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 311      English Novel                                       (3) [H]                
An examination of representative English novels from the beginning up to the Nineteenth Century. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

ENGL 312     American Novel                                    (3) [H]                
An examination of representative American novels from the beginning up to the Nineteenth Century. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.   Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 314     Modernism/ Postmodernism             (3) [H]                
This course investigates the trends in the intellectual and aesthetic movements that inform twentieth century Western ideas about art. Rejecting many 19th century standards, modernist figures such as Woolf, Joyce, Stein, Eliot, Pound, Mallarme, Kafka, and Stevens helped radically redefine literature and culture. Students will look at various modernist trends such as emphasis on impressionism and subjectivity, blurring of distinctions between genres, tendency toward fragmented forms, discontinuous narratives, etc., and will trace the continuation and/ or rejection of these early twentieth century trends in postmodernism. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 315     Twentieth Century American Literature                      (3) [H]  
Examines the major trends in 20th century U.S. Literature. Students may study artistic movements such as Naturalism, the Beats, the Harlem Renaissance, Lost Generation, and New Journalism, as well as literary responses to major historical events, such as the Great Depression, WW I and II, the Vietnam War, and major social movements of the second half of the century. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite ENGL101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 319     Women and Literature                        (3) [H]                
An examination of representations of women and womanhood over time and the way in which those representations are culturally constructed. The course will also offer an introduction to feminist theory and examine the resistant discourses of women writers. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

ENGL 343     Poetry and Poetics                               (3) [H]                
This course offers a comprehensive study of poetry as a genre and introduces the art of poetics.  The course will explore various visual, rhythmic and performance aspects of poetry while covering a wide range of poets, styles, traditions, forms and subgenres.  Prerequisite:  ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 345     Creative Writing                                   (3) [H]                
The craft and practice of creative writing (short fiction and poetry) involving extensive writing throughout the semester. The course includes regular examination of professional models and the writing generated and revised by students. In addition, students will actively be involved in developing AUK’s Arts and Literary Journal. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.   Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 349     Literature in Translation                    (3) [H]                
The course is an aesthetic and cultural evaluation of a specific non-English literature in translation (i.e., Arabic, French, German, Spanish, etc.). Poetry and fiction of non-English authors will be studied. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 355     Contemporary World Literature        (3) [H]                
An exploration of the ways contemporary literature responds to the complex reality of our world; modernist and postmodernist fiction from a variety of national literatures; examples from Robbe-Grillet, Lessing, Boll, Mann, Duras, Morrison, Walker, Kundera, Atwood, Munro, Coetzee, Achebe, Eco and Garcia Marquez.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 369     Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ENGL 375     Rhetorics of Cultural Dissonance      (3) [H]                
This course examines the ways in which language creates, reflects, and transforms cultural identity and beliefs and, consequently, our understanding of local and global relations of power.  Through analyses of the various expressive contexts from which ideas about identity and culture emerge, students will develop a greater understanding of the origins and contemporary manifestations of conflict between and within "East" and "West" and "North" and "South."  Cross listed with COMM 375. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 376     Language in the Arab World              (3) [H], [K]        
This course introduces students to the sociocultural, political, and educational dimensions of language in the Arab World. The course covers the historical and current sociopolitical contexts of Arabic in relation to French and Berber in countries such as Morocco and Algeria. It explores the widespread use of English in the Arab World and the consequences it might have on the Arabic language. The course will also study the official and non-official use of languages of non-Arab immigrants in the Gulf. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 378     English and Globalization                 (3) [H]                
This course explores social, political, linguistic and educational issues related to the spread of English in the world.  In addition to colonialism, the course examines the role of globalization in the emergence of English as an international language.  The course also focuses on the variation in the structure of different varieties of English.  Prerequisite:  ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 388     Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ENGL 389     Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

ENGL 400     Seminar in British Authors                 (3)                       
An in-depth study of the work of a significant British writer, or a small group of British writers. It will include the writer's context, approach, and contributions to literature and society. Junior Standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 401     Seminar in American Authors            (3)                       
An in-depth study of work of a significant American author, or a small group of American writers.  It will include the author's context, approach, and contributions to literature and society. Junior Standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 402     History of Theater and Drama           (3)                       
A comparative study of major works in theater and of theories of drama and performance from Ancient Greece and the Near East to the modern period. Special attention will be given to works representative to distinct periods and schools of theatre and drama. Junior Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 403     Modern Drama                                     (3)                       
This course extends the subject matter of ENGL 402 into the 20th century by focusing both on major dramatists but also tracing the development of national and regional dramas. Special attention will be paid to transformations of classical conventions of character, plot and audience as well as a broadening of subject matter and use of a variety of vernaculars. Junior Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 405     Postcolonial Literature                       (3)                       
In this course students will read and discuss novels, short stories, poetry, and essays from former British colonies in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean, as well as from the postcolonial Diasporas. Emphasis will be placed on the common experience of a postcolonial condition across various regions, with one of the primary themes being "Orientalism" or the image of the West in representative texts. Junior Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite:  ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 406     Ethnic American Literature               (3)                       
This course emphasizes the critical study of literature written by diverse ethnic American authors from colonial to contemporary times. It includes works by African-, Arab-, Asian-, European-, Hispanic-, and Native Americans. Junior Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 415     Literary Theory and Criticism           (3)                       
An introduction to central issues in Literary Criticism; the concept of literature, the relationship of literature to criticism, and the establishment of literary canons; key schools of criticism, including formalism, structuralism, post, post- structuralism, deconstruction and reception theory, and post-colonialism and their respective historical contexts; required of Literature Majors. Junior Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 470     Internship in English Language and Literature        (1 - 6)    
An Internship experience with the requirement that the student write a report summarizing what the internship job added to his to her knowledge of English Language and Literature. Students are limited to a maximum of 6 internship credit hours. This is a Pass/Fail course. Junior Standing and Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: A Minimum Grade Point Average of 2.0.
                                                                                                                    
ENGL 485     Senior Thesis                                         (3)                       
English Majors apply their writing abilities, research skills, and knowledge in an independent study project. Senior Standing and Permission of Instructor.


Engineering (ENGR)

ENGR 200     Engineering Design                            (3)                       
An overview of engineering as a profession, ethics in engineering, team work, reporting, engineering graphics and communication skills for an engineer, reverse engineering, design and build a project, engineering modeling, cost-benefit tradeoffs, product design and performance, business and career planning, and professional practice.
                                                                                                                    
ENGR 330     Engineering Economics                     (3)                       
Provides knowledge of economic consequences of engineering decision processes, and methods for evaluation of engineering design alternatives in terms of costs and benefits. Topics include time equivalence of money, annual cost method, present worth method, rate of return method, depreciation, benefit/cost, break-even analysis, income taxes, equipment replacement, and risk analysis. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: MATH 203.
                                                                                                                    
ENGR 369     Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ENGR 388     Independent Study                               (1 - 4)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ENGR 389     Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

Entrepreneurship Studies (ENTR)

ENTR 201      Principles of Entrepreneurship        (3)                       
The philosophy, motivation and characteristics of entrepreneurship.  Social, psychological, economic, and business factors in the success and failure of entrepreneurship; the entrepreneur; identifying and evaluating entrepreneurial opportunities; planning and developing a new business venture; managing the new venture; applications to creation and management  of stand-alone ventures and those developed within corporations. Prerequisite MGMT 201
                                                                                                                    
ENTR 301      Intermediate Entrepreneurship        (3)                       
Study of the nature and special conditions related to proprietorships, partnerships and small business enterprises. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENTR 201.
                                                                                                                    
ENTR 369     Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers.  Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ENTR 388     Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: ENGL 305 or MGMT 305.

ENTR 389     Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ENTR 470     Internship in Entrepreneurship        (1 - 3)                  

An Internship experience with the requirement that the student write a report summarizing what the internship job added to his or her knowledge of entrepreneurship and related fields. Students are limited to a maximum of 3 internship credit hours for any major and 6 credit hours overall. This is a Pass/Fail course. Senior Standing and Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisites: ENTR 201 and a Minimum Grade Point Average of 2.25.

Environmental Studies (ENVS)

ENVS 101       Introduction to Environmental Studies           (3) [S]    
Introduction to the major issues and themes within the field of Environmental Studies. Topics may include endangered species, air/ water pollution, energy, global warming, environmental law/ justice, ethics and policy.
                                                                                                                    
ENVS 215      Environmental Data Analysis           (3) [S]                 
This course will introduce students to statistics, data analysis, and probability to be able to evaluate and interpret environmental data. Topics will include: Statistics and data analysis; Frequency tables, bar charts, mean, standard deviation, and skewness; Linear regression; and Probability. Prerequisite: MATH 095.
                                                                                                                    
ENVS 220      Energy and the Environment            (3) [S]                 
Study of key physics principles as related to environmental issues, including: Energy forms; Energy recourses and conversions; Past and present patterns of energy use; Projection of future demand and supplies of energy; Role and method of physics in fostering rational evaluations of environmental problems and in searching for potential solutions; Resources and technologies of future energy alternatives.  Prerequisite: PHYS 101 or PHYS 105.
                                                                                                                    
ENVS 230      Environmental Geology                      (3) [P]                
Fundamental earth science concepts are used to assess the impact of increasing global population and development on earth's natural resources and also examine how natural processes affect human activities.  Topics include volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, flooding, tsunamis, soil erosion, landslides, stream flooding, and rock-falls.
                                                                                                                    
ENVS 305      Environmental Health                        (3) [P]                
An overview of environmental issues affecting human health and survival.  Students will be introduced to biological and chemical toxins in the general environment, environmental epidemiology, and relevant environmental regulations. Attention will be paid to environmental issues at home, in work settings, the community, and in the global context. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: BIOL 105.
                                                                                                                    
ENVS 310      Environmental Ethics                         (3) [S]                 
This course examines normative issues in the study of the environment.  Students will learn basic ethical concepts and theories and how to apply them to specific environmental concerns.  Students will be asked to develop arguments to defend their own respective views regarding the environment and to develop viewpoints reflecting thoughtful and scholarly consideration of human duties, both individual and social, to the environment. [Cross-listed with PHIl 310]. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ENVS 320      Global Environmental Policy            (3) [S]                 
A course that seeks to provide a broad overview of the key concepts, actors, and issues related to global environmental policy.  This course outlines the evolution of environmental policy in facing global environmental challenges and how such policies have become inherently intertwined with government policy and business practice. Junior or Senior Standing.

ENVS 369      Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ENVS 388      Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

ENVS 389      Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.


Finance (FINC)

FINC 207       Personal  Finance                                 (3)                       
This is a course in personal investing for non-finance majors. This course will not count for credit towards a major in finance. It will cover money markets, mutual funds, and diversification.
                                                                                                                    
FINC 332       Financial Management                       (3)                       
Financial statement analysis, pro forma financial statements, time value of money, discounted cash flow, stock and bond valuation, net present value.  Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: MATH 103 or MATH 110 or MATH 201, and ENGL 102 and ACCT 201.
                                                                                                                    
FINC 341       Corporate Finance                                (3)                       
Capital asset pricing model, cost of capital, capital structure and dividend policy. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: ACCT 205 and FINC 332.

FINC 343       Financial Services Management       (3)                       
The course will focus on operations in financial services management including applications of competitive strategies and explorations of opportunities in various financial services sectors including banking, insurance, and personal finance planning. The course will also examine this sector in the context of the Kuwait financial services companies. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisites: FINC 332.
                                                                                                                    
FINC 345       Investment and Securities Analysis  (3)                       
This course will focus on the financial theories and empirical evidence useful for investment decisions based on risk and returns. It covers optimal portfolio choice, asset pricing models, fixed-income securities, funds’ performance measurement, and a brief introduction to behavioral finance which studies how investor psychology may affect their investment decisions and asset prices in the market.  Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: FINC 332.
                                                                                                                    
FINC 355       Financial Markets and Institutions in Kuwait and the Gulf    (3) Organization of short-term money markets and long-term capital markets and institutions; investment instruments; investment constraints; resulting portfolios. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: FINC 332.
                                                                                                                    
FINC 365       International Finance                          (3)                       
Foreign Affairs, global capital markets, and international corporate finance. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: FINC 341

FINC 369       Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

FINC 388       Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

FINC 389       Special Topics                                       (3)                       
An analysis of contemporary issues in Finance. Can be repeated for credit with different topic.
Permission of Instructor.

FINC 413       Finance Capstone: Int’l Finance, Financial Markets & Institutions   (3)
A capstone course designed for a student's last semester in the university which may include analyses of cases, more in-depth study of specialized topics, current events in finance, financial analysis, and/or financial institutions. Senior Standing. Prerequisite: FINC 345 and FINC 355.
                                                                                                                    
FINC 445       Portfolio Management                        (3)                       
This course develops modern portfolio theory and applies it to pricing both individual assets and portfolios of assets. Topics include the Markowitz portfolio selection model, the capital asset pricing model, arbitrage pricing theory, options. Futures. Bonds, portfolio performance measurement, and issues of market efficiency. Senior Standing. Prerequisites: FINC 332 and FINC 341 and FINC 345.
                                                                                                                    
FINC 470       Internship in Finance                          (1 - 3)                  
An Internship experience with the requirement that the student write a report summarizing what the internship job added to his or her knowledge of finance and related fields. Students are limited to a maximum of 3 internship credit hours.  This is Pass/Fail course. Junior Standing and Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: A Minimum Grade Point Average of 2.25.

French (FRNC)

FRNC 101       Introduction to French I                     (3) [H]                
The course is designed for beginners. The objective of this course is to provide students with necessary skills in oral and written communication. The course is almost entirely taught in French.
                                                                                                                    
FRNC 102      Introduction to French II                    (3) [H]                
This course continues to reinforce communication skills with more emphasis placed on reading and writing texts. It will develop the ability to communicate with accurate pronunciation and intonation.  Students will be exposed to French culture with the use of video and other authentic material. Students may not enroll and will not receive credit for a language-learning course taken below the level of the language-learning course into which they were tested. Prerequisites: FRNC 101 or Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
FRNC 201      Intermediate French                            (3) [H]                
This course focuses on active communication skills, while working on spontaneous conversations related to daily-life topics.  More emphasis is placed on writing and using a variety of formats with increasing control of grammar.  Students will perfect their knowledge of French society through reading newspaper articles and literary texts. Students may not enroll and will not receive credit for a language-learning course taken below the level of the language-learning course into which they were tested. Prerequisites: FRNC 102 or Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
FRNC 202      Intermediate French II                       (3) [H]                
While still focusing on oral communication, more emphasis will be placed on reading short texts and writing short paragraphs. Students will develop a strong knowledge of French grammar (verbs in present, past, future and subjunctive), and a strong vocabulary base.  Prerequisite: FRNC 201 or Permission of instructor.
                                                                                                                    
FRNC 333      Language and Civilization                 (3) [H]                
An advanced language course that improves student's oral, reading, and writing skills through an examination of French society. Themes covered include family, education, arts, gastronomy, politics, and immigration. Class discussions will be based on literary readings, articles from French newspapers internet materials, songs, a selection of French films, and field trips. Sophomore Standing and Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
FRNC 369      Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers.  Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

FRNC 388      Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

FRNC 389      Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

FRNC 399      French Study Abroad                           (1 - 3)                  
This course is an option for students who wish to achieve fluency and an understanding of life in France. Students will study in a French speaking environment. Many course assignments will take place out of a traditional classroom setting and students will be required to interact with native speakers every day. Pre-requisite: Permission of instructor and FRNC 101.


Graphic Design (GDES)

GDES 102      Creative Visualization                         (3)                       
This introductory studio course teaches students the creative skills they need to visually communicate ideas. Students will learn how to deal with spatial relationships between images and words, unlock and decode ideas, as well as how to research, brainstorm, edit and enhance their creative thoughts.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 110       Digital Foundations                             (3)                       
This course introduces students to fundamental principles and applications of design, emphasizing critical and cultural awareness of design issues and developing of technical skills.  The notion of creative problem solving is particularly emphasized.  Students develop expertise in major industry standard software packages.  This course lays the foundation for further study of design. A lab fee may be required. Cross-listed with COMM 110.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 115       Color Theory                                         (3)                       
This is an introductory studio course devoted to the development of the perception of color and its use as a tool for artists and designers. The exercises test the appearance of color relationships in complex structures, dealing with meaning and examining the appropriate use of color in the context of design problems. Cross-listed with ART 115.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 204      Digital Photography                            (3)                       
This course provides an introduction to digital photography and digital camera operations, covering lighting, composition, exposure and the fundamentals of traditional photographic concepts. Students will use digital cameras to take photos that meet the requirements of a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills, and stimulate the students' creative capacities for personal expression, communication and self-understanding. Co-requisites or Prerequisites: GDES 110 or COMM 110.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 208      Film Production I                                 (3)                       
Introduces students to basics of cinematic storytelling through narrative genres and documentaries. Examines the basics of script-writing, directing, cinematography, and editing.  Develops skills in all areas of the craft, and explores both the creative and the technical aspects of production. Includes a short project.  Familiarizes students with the nature of filmmaking through lectures and working experiments with traditional narrative filmmaking, documentary, and new media. Cross-listed with COMM 208.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 220      Graphic Design I                                  (3)                       
An introductory course to the field of graphic design and visual problem solving. Students will learn basic design principles and elements of design, composition, form, typography, and the historical context is introduced in this course. Provides practical experience in essential studio processes and procedures, critiques, and group discussions. Co-requisite or Pre-requisite:  GDES 110 or COMM 110, ART 115 or GDES 115, GDES 102 and ART 121.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 221      Typography I                                        (3)                       
An introduction to typography as both language and tool, one through which a graphic designer can communicate visual hierarchy, verbal information, form, and meaning. This course explores type design, the study of letterforms, an introduction to the historical and modern development of the alphabet, and the study of grid structures. Co-requisite or Pre-requisite: ART 115 or GDES 115. Prerequisites: ART 101 and ART 121, and GDES 110 or COMM 110, and GDES 102.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 242      Digital Imaging I                                 (3)                       
This course introduces digital manipulation and enhancement of photographic images. Students learn to retouch and enhance digital inputs to create high-quality digital photographic outputs for use in print creation and screen presentations. A lab fee may be required. Prerequisite: GDES 110 or COMM 110, GDES 220 and GDES 221.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 315      History of Design                                 (3)                       
This course explores the evolution of graphic design from past to present. Prerequisite: ART 101.

GDES 320      Graphic Design II                                (3)                       
This intermediate studio course is a comprehensive study of graphic design through the integration of typography and imagery; from topic selection to research; and from concept building to the visualization of content. Students will enhance layout skills, and work with alternative materials. Class time will be devoted to lectures, projects and critiques will be developed. Prerequisites: GDES 220 and GDES 221.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 321      Typography II                                       (3)                       
This course further explores the sequence of type-oriented assignments and projects; students explore a variety of advanced functional and formal typographic issues.  Perceptual, emotional and stylistic considerations of typographic usages are also covered.  This is a studio course.  Prerequisite: GDES 221 and GDES 220
                                                                                                                    
GDES 330      Print Production                                  (3)                       
This course explores the various printing technologies currently available for graphic designers, with an emphasis on the Off-Set printing process. Pre-press, printing, post-production, and all the supporting services offered by printing houses, will be thoroughly investigated throughout this course. Prerequisites: GDES 220 and GDES 221.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 337      Environmental Design                        (3)                       
A studio course that explores way finding, storytelling, exhibit and information design in built and natural environments. Students will learn how to use the blend of two and three-dimensional design to move people and/or vehicles through spaces. Projects may include the study of zoos, museums, sport complexes, hospitals, or airports. Junior standing.  Prerequisite: GDES 320.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 342      Digital Imaging II                               (3)                       
Inspiration and storyboard are challenged to push the envelope of the traditional parameters expected during Image Production. The students blend different styles to produce aesthetically sound pieces. Different Image tracks may be chosen to focus on for the majority of the semester.  A lab fee may be required. Prerequisite: GDES 242.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 351      Web Design                                           (3)                       
This course explores the process of designing and building web sites, as well as creating graphics, animations and rich content for the web. It also incorporates lectures relating to Internet issues and the different web-based media forms being utilized those days. Prerequisites: GDES 110 or Permission of instructor.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 369      Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

GDES 388      Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

GDES 389      Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

GDES 404      Professional Practice                           (3)                       
The course is designed to prepare students for professional practice in graphic design. It is a guide to business aspects of design including best practices in business processes, self-promotion, negotiation and pricing, ethical standards and the designer's responsibility of practice. Prerequisite: GDES 320.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 420      Graphic Design III                              (3)                       
This advance course further investigates system design, research analysis and development of a brand.  Students will work in a collaborative environment, in an intense investigation of visual communication, critique session, group discussions, presentations and field trips.  This is a studio course.  Senior standing.  Prerequisite:  GDES 320 and GDES 321.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 421      Typography III                                     (3)                       
This advance course further investigates typographic form, history, hierarchy, context and sequence of information using image and type relationships.  Lectures, critiques and individual in-class explorations are used to further these ideas.  This is a studio course, Senior standing.  Prerequisite:  GDES 321 and GDES 320.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 452      3D Modeling and Animation              (3)                       
This course will introduce principles and techniques used for creating three-dimensional content in virtual space.  Students will learn principles of model creation, texture manipulation, scene rendering and animation to enable them to conceptualize and produce meaningful and artistic visualizations.  The class will also explore the implications of the work produced as students engage in mutual critique. A lab fee may be required. Junior Standing.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 453      Motion Graphics                                  (3)                       
In this advance level course, students experiment their learning outcomes on form and content through manipulation of movement, time, sequence and sounds.  Students will learn and create visual effects, wide range of application in broadcast, film and video based communication.  This is a studio course.  Junior standing.  Prerequisite: GDES 242.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 470      Internship in Graphic Design            (1 - 3)                  
The GDES Internship provides students the opportunity to work in career-related fields for academic credit. A creative paper submission is expected upon the completion of the internship. Students are limited to a maximum of 6 internship credit hours of which only 3 count toward the degree requirement. This is a Pass/Fail course. Junior standing and Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
GDES 490      Capstone                                                (3)                       
The Capstone course is designed to teach GDES students how to visualize the complex intersection between personal voice, conceptual understanding, and the use of research for a graphic design exhibition. The course is largely self-directed and students are expected to select and investigate a topic using design as a means to present their findings. Permission of Instructor.

Health & Fitness (HFIT)

HFIT 101        Introduction to Health and Wellness             (1) [F]    
An introduction to the physiological, social, and psychological factors in life-long health and fitness; self-responsibility for total wellness. Introduction to wellness concerns such issues as disease prevention, stress management and behavioral and mental health. Occasional.
                                                                                                                    
HFIT 103       Nutrition and Health                           (3) [F]                 
An analysis of the role and value of nutrition in maintaining health, mental health, and physical fitness; diet and nutrition; special needs of overweight and underweight individuals; food mythologies.
                                                                                                                    
HFIT 110        Physical Activity                                  (1) [F]                 
This course offers students an opportunity to participate in physical activities/sports such as aerobics, yoga, basketball, soccer, volleyball or other physical activities. Occasional.


History (HIST)

HIST 105        World History Since 1900                    (3) [S]                 
May include but not limited to the following interpretations for understanding the modern world: Late Nineteenth Century political and economic history; the history of world warfare and revolution; the history of women; global society during the Cold War; de-colonization and history "from below"; and the oral history of the recent past.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 110        Twentieth Century Middle East        (3) [S]                 
The course concentrates on ideologies and practices of colonial control, on local resistance and collaboration as defined by the emergence of new social classes and political movements, and on the definition of state and nation-building in the post-colonial era. Topics include the 1950s, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Iranian Revolution, and the Gulf Wars.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 201        History and Politics of Kuwait           (3) [S]                 
An introduction to the contemporary political, economic and social history of Kuwait.

HIST 202       History and Politics of the Iranian World                    (3) [S]    
The course attempts to review the historical and political development of the Iranian world since the advent of Islam in the 7th century. The core concentration of the course is on the emergence of modern Iran as a national state; and how she embraced Shi'ism as the state religion in the 16th century, thus setting herself apart from the majority of the Islamic world.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 221        Survey of Gulf History                         (3) [S]                 
A historical understanding of the Arab Gulf, it examines key issues in the politics and society of the region before the discovery of oil and focuses on different processes of state formation. It is designed to highlight the multi-faceted nature of Gulf politics, and to provide continuity / change perspective on themes of regional unity versus political fragmentation.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 289       Topics in World History                      (3) [S]                 
The rise and development of the modern world from various eighteenth and nineteenth century perspectives, including that of the French Revolution in the West, independence in the Americas, colonialism in Africa and India, the decay of the Ottoman Empire in the Near East, and the Opium War in China. Sophomore standing.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 303       Ancient History                                    (3) [S]                 
Comparative examination of the rise and fall, social, political, and cultural influence of Greek and Hellenistic, Indian, Classical Roman, Han, and pre-Colombian American civilizations. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisites: Any 100 or 200 - level HIST course, or AMST 121 or IR 204 or 205.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 305       History of the Islamic World 622-1800                          (3) [S]    
Survey of Islamic history from the time of the Prophet Mohammad to 1800.  Includes political, social and intellectual history. An introduction to the fundamental doctrines of Islam; Islamic institutions; classical and medieval Arab-Islamic history; major themes and disciplines that have informed the writing of Arab-Islamic history and their relation to Islamic law, theology, politics, ethics and science; selections from important and influential historians and historiographers.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: Any 100 or 200 - level HIST course, or AMST 121 or IR 204 or 205.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 307       Arab History in the Late Ottoman Period: 1800-1922  (3) [S]    
History of the Arab World in the late Ottoman period until the Great Arab Revolt.  Includes European intervention in Arab domains of the Ottoman Empire.  Major doctrines and ideologies of modern Islamic and Arab thought are outlined; intellectual history of Arab-Islamic writers; writings on history, Islam, Arabism and Arab nationalism of well-known historians and intellectuals that have contributed and shaped modern Islamic and Arab thought are required reading.  Transformation of Arab societies as a result of integration into European capitalism. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisites: Any 100 or 200 - level HIST course, or AMST 121 or IR 204 or 205.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 311        Ottoman History                                   (3) [S]                 
Survey of Ottoman History with emphasis on the Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries. European imperialism and Ottoman responses to European encroachment and intervention; Ottoman Reforms; Ottoman and Turkish nationalism. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: Any 100 or 200 - level HIST course, or AMST 121 or IR 204 or 205.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 317        Topics in English / British History  (3) [S]                 
Exploration of the history of England and Britain: Parliament, Common Law, the civil war, the question of kingship, the conflict of church and state; the Industrial Revolution, the growth of the British Empire (excluding India and the Middle East); 20th century conflicts; Constitutional monarchy; globalization; and the creation of the United Kingdom. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites Any 100 or 200 - level HIST course, or AMST 121 or IR 204 or 205.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 369       Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

HIST 388       Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
A research and writing project to be determined in consultation with the Instructor. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Senior standing or Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 389       Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Sophomore, Junior and Senior standing.

HIST 401        Economic History: Twentieth Century                         (3)         
Historical investigation of economic development. Comparison of European and the Third World development. Junior standing. Prerequisites: Any 100 or 200 - level HIST course, or AMST 121 or IR 204 or 205.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 421        Intellectual History                             (3)                       
Survey of Western and non-Western intellectual History in the context of social, economic and political change; major intellectual movements in the modern times.  Junior standing.  Prerequisites: Any 100 or 200 - level HIST course, or AMST 121 or IR 204 or 205.
                                                                                                                    
HIST 430       Oral History                                          (3)                       
A history seminar that critically examines current issues via the method of oral history. Additionally, this seminar will enable students to apply methods of research and analysis from various university programs as they prepare for and analyze interviews. The course will involve participation in at least two oral history projects over the course of the semester.  Cross-listed with COMM 430. Junior standing. Prerequisites: COMM 101 or any HIST 100 or 200 level courses or AMST 121 or IR 204 or IR 205.


Human Resources (HR)

HR 205           Human Resources Management        (3)                       
This course examines theories and practice of human resources management in local, regional and global contexts. The course focuses on key aspects of human resources, planning, and their implications on public and/ or business policy. It also studies major models that shape human resources development. Pre-requisite: MGMT 201.
                                                                                                                    
HR 325           Contemporary Issues in HR                (3)                       
This course focuses on new, empirically supported, specialized HR techniques. Students will acquire an analytical approach to HR issues using validation and validity generalization procedures. Topics may include: job satisfaction management; absenteeism & retention; risk management & disaster preparation; and job evaluation for wage structuring. Pre-requisite: HR 205.
                                                                                                                    
HR 345           Conflict Resolution                              (3)                       
Varied theories, perspectives and practices in conflict resolution. Review of case studies of conflict resolution proposals. Research, analysis, and writing of case studies in conflict resolution. Stress is on innovative and original proposals for conflict resolution in case studies. Pre-requisite: IR 101.
                                                                                                                    
HR 388           Independent Study                               (1 OR 3)             
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

HR 389           Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Topics vary by semester. Each offering provides students the opportunity to study a topic either not addressed in other HR courses or one previously addressed, but in greater depth. Pre-requisite: HR 325.
                                                                                                                    
HR 470           Internship in Human Resources        (1 OR 3)             
Students apply class room learning and gain experience in the real world of HR, something particularly valuable for non-BBA students. Students must keep a journal and write a report describing what the internship job added to their knowledge of HR. This is a Pass/Fail course.

Free Elective Under Any Humanities Discipline

HUEL 473     Internship for Free Elective Arts & Humanities        (1 - 3)    
Supervised experience designed to enhance intellectual development through application of knowledge in an occupation.  Requirements include: weekly log and final report explaining what the internship added to the student's knowledge in an approved discipline.  A Pass/No Pass Course requiring Junior Standing and Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: Minimum GPA or 2.00.


International Relations (IR)

IR 101             Introduction to International Relations                        (3) [S]    
The role of the sovereign state in a complex and interdependent state system; introduction to global political economy; labor migrations; internationalization of communication; international environmental issues; monetary, financial and energy issues; patterns of conflict and cooperation; international and regional state organizations; and non-state political and social movements.
                                                                                                                    
IR 204             Survey of European Political History                           (3) [S]    
Examination of the major political, economic, and social themes of western civilization. Topics include the rise of civilization in the Near East, ancient Greece and Rome, the rise of Christianity, the impact of the Germanic invasions, the rise of Islam, Europe in the High Middle Ages, the Renaissance / Reformation, the birth of diplomacy, the wars of religion, the rise of independent states and overseas expansion.
                                                                                                                    
IR 205             Modern Europe                                    (3) [S]                 
The political, economic, and social development of Europe from the Peace of Westphalia to the twentieth century. Topics include the rise of absolutism, the Enlightenment and democratic revolutions, industrialization, the emergence of liberalism, capitalism, socialism, the two world wars, and the Cold War.
                                                                                                                    
IR 210             Methods of Research in International Relations         (3) [S]    
Introduction to scientific method, data gathering, research design, statistical analysis, and computer applications for international relations and comparative studies research.  Develops analytical skills that students need as active consumers of research findings.  Cross listed with PLSC 210. Prerequisites:  IR 101 or PLSC 202.
                                                                                                                    
IR 309             Dynamics of Globalization                 (3) [S]                 
Causes and consequences of contemporary global transformations. Is globalization today unique, or part of a recurring pattern in world politics? Analysis of the opportunities and vulnerabilities created by globalization, and of the politics of anti-globalization movements. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: IR 101.
                                                                                                                    
IR 310             Twentieth Century Arab Middle East                          (3) [S]    
Contemporary Arab history and politics including European colonialism, struggles for independence, Zionism and the colonization of Palestine, Arab nationalism, Arab socialism, the rise of oil revenues, the rise of political Islam, and current conflicts in the region. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
IR 319             The British Empire                              (3) [S]                 
The rise, structure, and dynamics of the British Empire with special emphasis on its policies, actions, and impact on India, the Arabian Peninsula, and the rest of the Middle East. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
IR 339             International Organizations               (3) [S]                 
The study of the origins, charters, organizational structure, activities, and performance of international organizations; the United Nations; the International Monetary Fund; the World Bank; the World Trade Organization, and others.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: IR 101.
                                                                                                                    
IR 341             Public International Law                   (3) [S]                 
This course emphasizes the origins, sources and subjects of International Law. It, also examines the role of the law in the international arena, insofar it facilitates relations among states, resolve disputes, protect rights of individuals, allocate resources and restrict conduct during wartime. The course is enriched with international law cases and the policy ramifications of their decisions. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: IR 101.
                                                                                                                    
IR 342             International  Human Rights             (3) [S]                 
This course examines the evolution of the modern human rights regime. It juxtaposes the Western origins with competing, non-western systems of thought and practices of rights, as well as assesses in this context the universality of modern human rights norms.
                                                                                                                    
IR 343             Terrorism and International Law      (3) [S]                 
This course studies international law as it pertains to the study of terrorism. It examines the international law of war and international criminal law and the development of an international law of terrorism.
                                                                                                                    
IR 345             Conflict Resolution                              (3) [S]                 
Varied theories, perspectives and practices in conflict resolution.  Review of case studies of conflict resolution proposals.  Research, analysis, and writing of case studies in conflict resolution. Stress is on innovative and original proposals for conflict resolution in case studies. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: IR 101.
                                                                                                                    
IR 369             Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

IR 386             Persp. on US Foreign Policy in the ME (Soliya Connect Program)    (3)
This course explores the major debates, both theoretical and applied that frame contemporary discussion about American foreign policy in the Middle East and illuminates the perspectives of different focal actors and institutions including: the presidency, government’s agencies, legislators, interest groups, the mass public and the media. It examines the interplay between policy development and institutions, and reviews normative and empirical models of American Foreign Policy. Course work is enriched with the Soliya Connect Program and accordingly it will run as a senior seminar. Prerequisite: Junior Standing or permission of the Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
IR 388             Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Senior standing. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

IR 389             Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing. Can be repeated for credit with different topic.

IR 400             Colonialism                                           (3)                       
A comparative analysis of colonialism, its rise, justification, dynamics, and consequences on the colonized societies and the colonial powers. Issues of post-colonial problems including nation building, economic development, political stability, democracy and civil rights. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: IR 101.
                                                                                                                    
IR 405             Comparative Economic and Political Systems            (3)         
A theoretical and historical evaluation of different economic and political systems, planning strategies, and their effects on economic growth, democracy, equity, and effectiveness. The course examines the historical experience of political and economic institutional arrangements in formerly socialist societies, European counties, and nation-states in the Middle East. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: PLSC 200.
                                                                                                                    
IR 412             Sustainable Development                   (3)                       
The problem of sustainable development. A survey of development models and practices; assessment of development practices in the Third World in the last three decades; new theories for sustainability of social, economic, and political development. Junior standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: IR 101 and ECON 409.
                                                                                                                    
IR 470             Internship in International Relations                           (1 - 3)    
An Internship experience to apply the knowledge acquired in the International Relations Program.  A maximum of three (3) internship credit hours can be applied to the IR degree program.  Permission of Instructor required.
                                                                                                                    
IR 485             Senior Seminar in Conflict Resolution                          (3)         
A senior seminar that examines selected critical issues in the field of Conflict Resolution. Senior standing. Only declared Majors in the International Relations program may take this course.
                                                                                                                    
IR 486             Senior Seminar in International Law and Organizations         (3)      
A senior seminar that examines selected critical issues in the field of International Law and Organizations. Senior standing. Only declared Majors in the International Relations program may take this course.
                                                                                                                    
IR 487             Senior Seminar in International Political Economy   (3)         
A senior seminar that examines selected critical issues in the field of International Political Economy. Senior standing. Only declared Majors in the International Relations program may take this course.

Italian (ITAL)

ITAL 101        Introduction to Italian I                      (3) [H]                
The goals of this course are communicative. They are aimed at developing the four skills with an initial emphasis in listening and speaking. The course provides various opportunities for students to communicate in Italian in reality based situations.
                                                                                                                    
ITAL 102        Introduction to Italian II                    (3) [H]                
This courses reviews material covered in ITAL 101. Students will gain proficiency in all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) and develop an understanding of the Italian people and culture. Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisite: ITAL 101.
                                                                                                                    
ITAL 201        Intermediate Italian                            (3) [H]                

This course offers a complete review of the basic principles of grammar in addition to extensive oral practice. Emphasis is placed on developing good conversational ability. More focus will be placed on vocabulary building, reading and writing short texts in given situations. Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisites: ITAL 102.

Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 095    Preparatory Mathematics                   (3)                       
This course is given at the elementary level. It is designed to strengthen a student's existing skills in elementary Algebra and Geometry and to prepare students to study College Algebra, Finite Mathematics, Introduction to Modern Mathematics, Mathematics for Business, and Statistics.
                                                                                                                    
MATH 100     College Algebra                                    (3) [M]               
Intermediate Algebra, review of polynomials and rational expressions, equations and inequalities, graphs, functions and their properties, polynomial (piecewise defined), and exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: MATH 095 or by Placement Test.
                                                                                                                    
MATH 101     Finite Mathematics                              (3) [M]               
Review of Algebra, sets, linear equations and nonlinear equations and inequalities, interest, systems of linear equations, functions, graphs and elementary data analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 100 or by Placement Test.
                                                                                                                    
MATH 102     Introduction To Modern Mathematics                         (3) [M]  
A brief survey of several branches of mathematics that have arisen during the past 150 years. Topics are examined so their influence on modern life can be appreciated. They include the mathematics of voting, sharing and apportionment, graph theory, networks and fractal geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 100 or by Placement Test.
                                                                                                                    
MATH 103     Mathematics for Business                   (3) [M]               
Sets, relations, functions, maxima and minima, sequences, power series; analytical geometry; conics; exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions; rate of change, the derivative and applications, Taylor approximation, matrix Algebra, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 100 or by Placement Test.
                                                                                                                    
MATH 110     Pre-Calculus                                         (3) [M]               
Polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and inverses, sequences, series, systems of linear and nonlinear equations and inequalities, complex numbers, vectors, binomial theorem, mathematical induction, conics, and the use of technology for problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH 100 or by Placement Test.
                                                                                                                    
MATH 201     Calculus I                                              (3) [M]               
Functions, limits and continuity, derivatives and applications, Riemann Sums, integration. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or by Placement Test.

MATH 203    Calculus II                                             (3) [M]               
Fundamental integration techniques, numerical integration, applications of integration, improper integrals, differential equations, sequences and series, and the use of CAS.  Prerequisite: MATH 201.
                                                                                                                    
MATH 205    Linear Algebra                                     (3) [M]               
Topics include systems of linear equations, matrices, Gauss-Jordan elimination, determinants, vectors in two, three, and "n" dimensions, vector spaces, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, linear transformations, inner product spaces, complex vector spaces, and applications to various fields.  Prerequisite: MATH 203.
                                                                                                                    
MATH 206    Calculus III                                           (3) [M]               
Parametric equations, polar coordinates, surfaces in space, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, the chain rules, gradients, directional derivatives, total derivatives, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, Fubini's Theorem, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vector fields, line integrals, curl, divergence, Green's and Stoke's theorem. Use of CAS.  Prerequisites: MATH 203.
                                                                                                                    
MATH 210     Differential Equations                        (3) [M]               
Differential equations of first order, applications, singular solutions, linear equations with constant coefficients, miscellaneous methods for equations of higher order, solution in series, total differential equations, qualitative methods, and the use of the computer package Mathematica.  Prerequisite: MATH 203.

MATH 213     Discrete Mathematics                         (3) [M]               

Logic of compound and quantified statements, elementary number theory, methods of proof, sequences, mathematical induction, set theory, functions, relations, graphs, and trees. Prerequisite: MATH 110.
                                                                                                                    
MATH 325    Numerical Computing                        (3)                       
Introduction to numerical algorithms, root finding, Approximation of functions, collocation, numerical integration and differentiation. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: MATH 203 and CSIS 120.
                                                                                                                    
MATH 388    Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

MATH 389    Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.


Management (MGMT)

MGMT 201    Principles of Management                 (3)                       
Surveys of current management theories, research, and practice. Course content is a synthesis of behavioral sciences concepts that provide the basic framework for the practice of management. Topics include organizational goals and responsibilities, organizational control, decision making theory, planning, leadership, motivation, small group behavior, conflict and organizational development and change. Prerequisites: ENGL 102.
                                                                                                                    
MGMT 301    Change Management                          (3)                       
This course aims at offering students the knowledge and skills they will need to face the challenges of organizational change. It investigates the change capabilities of organizations, the reasons people may resist change, and introduces models of the change process and how it could be managed effectively. The course focuses on specific concepts, theories and tools of change management and identifies common mistakes, and reasons why change initiatives fail, as well as the factors underlying the successful management of change projects. Prerequisite: MGMT 201.
                                                                                                                    
MGMT 303   Management and Leadership Development                (3)         
Develops the management leadership and organization perspectives essential to the success of small to large businesses and individual managers. Development of management and organization leadership, creativity and innovation are stressed. Enhancing the manager's communication and negotiation skills is a critical dimension to developing effective managers. Developing an understanding of management philosophy and values and their practical impacts on managing a business is stressed.  Prerequisite: MGMT 201.
                                                                                                                    
MGMT 305   Professional Writing and Communication                   (3)         
This course explores professional approaches to communication in today's global business environment.  It also focuses on principles and practices needed for effective internal and external business communication (memos, letters, reports, proposals and presentations).  Students learn to write successful business reports and communications.  Also, students evaluate case studies in business and use appropriate style-guides to document sources. Cross-listed with ENGL 305. Prerequisite: ENGL 102.
                                                                                                                    
MGMT 315    Decision Making in Management     (3)                       
The study of individual and group decision making in the organization. The process of arriving at a judgment based upon the feedback of multiple individuals and teams. Includes the use of decision making models and matrixes. Prerequisite: MGMT 201.
                                                                                                                    
MGMT 333   Organizational Behavior                     (3)                       
This course studies human capital management. The course offers a synthesis of behavioral science theories providing a broad framework for understanding the motivation, planning, and control of business' most important assets. Cross-listed with PLSC 333.  Prerequisite: MGMT 201.
                                                                                                                    
MGMT 343   Quantitative Research Methods for Business              (3)         
Introduction to the scientific method, research design, data gathering, statistical analysis of data; computer applications for business issues; student develops the skills for becoming an active and informed consumer of research methodology and findings. Prerequisite: MATH 103 or MATH 110, and STAT 201.
                                                                                                                    
MGMT 350   Organizational Communication and Leadership        (3)         
Teaches students the role of communication in creating a productive organizational environment in terms of interpersonal and group behavior.  Reviews the theory and practice of team building, conflict resolution and problem solving and explores how communication and organizational cultures relate to each other. Cross-listed with COMM 350. Prerequisite: COMM 325 or MGMT 201.
                                                                                                                    
MGMT 369   Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

MGMT 388   Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

MGMT 389   Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

MGMT 413    MGMT Capstone: Business Operations                        (3)         
Links in organizational behavior & change management in understanding ways competitive advantage can be developed through manufacturing operations. Includes concepts and analytical tools needed for successful management of production of goods and services, procurement, inventory control, order fulfillment and delivery. Co-requisite: MGMT 333.  Pre-requisites: BUS 210 and MGMT 301.
                                                                                                                    
MGMT 470   Internship in Management                (1 - 6)                  
An Internship experience with the requirement that students keep a journal and write a report summarizing what the internship job added to their knowledge of management and related fields. Students are limited to a maximum of 3 internship credit hours for any major and 6 credits overall. This is a Pass/Fail course. Permission of Instructor.

MGMT 485   Senior Seminar in Management        (3)                       
This is a seminar for seniors where students conduct research projects on varying relevant and cutting edge managerial issues; presentation of research approaches, subject and results; a group project and an individual research project may be allowed. Instructor may vary and topics in theory and practice. Senior Standing. Prerequisite: MGMT 201.

Marketing (MRKT)

MRKT 200     Principles of Marketing                      (3)                       
Introduction to marketing decision making in business and nonprofit organizations.  Particular attention is devoted to analysis of customer needs; segmenting markets; and developing product, promotion, pricing and distribution strategies.  Relationships between consumers, business and government are explored.  Prerequisite: ECON 101 or ECON 200.
                                                                                                                    
MRKT 309     Principles of E-Commerce                 (3)                       
Internet marketing; decision making regarding promotion, pricing and distribution strategies via the Internet; product development and e-marketing; electronic markets; Internet purchasing behavior; Internet and e-mail advertising; Web sponsorships; Internet marketing ethics. Case studies of U.S. and Kuwaiti companies that have active Internet presence. Prerequisite: MRKT 200.
                                                                                                                    
MRKT 329     International Marketing                     (3)                       
Examines theories, practices, and contemporary issues related to global marketing management and the international marketing environment. The course discusses strategic decisions related to international product and policies and examines ethical issues, global marketing organizations, and multi-national economic integration. Applications of global marketing strategies will be discussed through case analysis.  Prerequisite: MRKT 200.
                                                                                                                    
MRKT 349     Consumer Behavior                              (3)                       
The course examines the patterns and factors influencing the consumer and organizational behavior. The course material also includes concepts and findings from behavioral sciences. Analysis includes an integrated model of consumer behavior and the elements that influence decision-making process. Consumer behavior in global markets is also emphasized. Prerequisite: MRKT 200.
                                                                                                                    
MRKT 355     Promotion and Advertising                (3)                       
Development of a promotional and advertising campaign for clients; formulation of advertising strategy, targeted audiences and consumer; multimedia campaign planning, campaign execution, and campaign evaluation. Prerequisite: MRKT 200.
                                                                                                                    
MRKT 369     Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisite: MRKT 200.
                                                                                                                    
MRKT 388     Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisite: MRKT 200.

MRKT 389     Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: MRKT 200.

MRKT 401     Marketing Research                            (3)                       
Applies the scientific investigation in solving marketing problems. Topics include problem/ opportunity formulation, determination of objectives, creation of research design, and selection of data collection method, data analysis, interpretation of results, report production, and follow-up activities. There is a focus on strategic implications of marketing research and real-life applications through case analysis. Junior Standing. Prerequisites: STAT 201 and MRKT 200.
                                                                                                                    
MRKT 413     Marketing Capstone: Marketing Strategy                    (3)         
Methodology of planning and development strategy for marketing consumer products and services; launching a new product or service; interfacing with sales forecasting, test marketing, marketing research, segmentation, positioning, analysis of the competition, research and development and profit.  Case studies used.  Senior Standing.  Prerequisites:  MRKT 200.
                                                                                                                    
MRKT 415     Supply Chain Management                (3)                       
Analyzes the various factors involved in designing and managing channels of distribution. The role of various channel members and their behavior, conflicts, cooperation, and motivation will be examined along with marketing logistics such as the impact of distribution policies on costs and customer service. Models and quantitative methods are utilized. Senior Standing. Prerequisite: MRKT 200 and ECON 209.
                                                                                                                    
MRKT 470     Internship in Marketing                     (1 - 3)                  
An Internship experience with the requirement that the student write a report summarizing what the internship job added to his or her knowledge of marketing and related fields. Students are limited to a maximum of 3 internship credit hours for any major and 6 credits overall. This is a Pass/Fail course. Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: MRKT 200.

Music (MUSC)

MUSC 101      Music Appreciation                             (3) [H]                
Chronological study of music styles of the western world, including an introduction to music elements and a review of the lives and works of famous composers.

MUSC 105      Introduction to World Music             (3) [H]                
An introduction to various music cultures through musical, social, and aesthetic approaches. The cultures featured can vary from semester to semester.

MUSC 110      Applied Lessons                                   (1 - 2) [H]           
Private intensive instrument or voice instruction. May be repeated for 8 total earned credits. Permission of instructor.

MUSC 160      Ensemble                                               (3) [H]                
Students sing and/or perform musical instruments in a group setting. Can be repeated for credit.
Permission of Instructor.

MUSC 165      Percussion Ensemble                          (3) [H]                

An introductory performing percussion ensemble class (xylophones, other idiophones, drums). Students work on technical and reading skills while rehearsing beginning level repertoire and acquiring crucial experience in the rehearsal/performance processes. The course will culminate with an end-of-semester performance.
                                                                                                                    
MUSC 215      Guitar Class                                           (3) [H]                
Development of basic guitar skills, including sight-reading and accompanying.  It is recommended that MUSC 220 be taken before or concurrently with MUSC 215.

MUSC 216      Piano Class                                            (3) [H]                
A complete orientation to the keyboard for beginning pianists.  Students are introduced to proper performance technique, etudes and scales, grand staff reading, sight reading, harmonization, solos and duets, and key signatures.  It is recommended that MUSC 220 be taken before or concurrently with MUSC 216.
                                                                                                                    
MUSC 217      Voice Class                                            (3) [H]                
An introduction to the basic principles of singing with particular attention to issues of breathing, tone, diction, and vocal range.

MUSC 220     Music Theory I                                     (3) [H]                
Skill development in the foundations of music. Students learn to read and write music notation, sing from musical scores, and analyze chords, melody, rhythm, and musical form.
                                                                                                                    
MUSC 230     Music Theory II                                   (3) [H]                
This course is a continuation of MUSC 220 (Music Theory I).  Students gain further understanding of how music is constructed through intermediate analysis of chords, melody, rhythm, musical form, and an examination of analytical techniques.  Music Theory II is designed to help students acquire the knowledge and discipline necessary for success as a musician.  Prerequisite:  MUSC 220 with a grade of C or higher or permission of instructor.

MUSC 310      Applied Lessons II                               (1 - 2) [H]           

Advanced private intensive instrument or voice instruction for students with established performance ability. May be repeated for 8 total earned credits. Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
MUSC 369     Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

MUSC 370     Music of the Arabian Peninsula        (3) [H], [K]        
Examination of music and poetic genres of Kuwait and regions of the Arabian Peninsula including structural analysis and study of the context in which creative forms exist. This course satisfies the General Education Requirement for Arab Culture. Cross-listed with SBSA 370.  Junior Standing and Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
MUSC 388     Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

MUSC 389     Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

MUSC 399     Music and Culture Study Abroad      (1 - 3)                  
Introduces students to the dynamics of traditional cultures through ethno musicological research and observance of live music, dance, and dramatic performances. The close interaction with other cultures enables students to better appreciate societies and sensibilities that may be different from their own. Schedule can vary each semester. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Junior Standing and Permission of Instructor.

Natural Sciences (NSCI)

NSCI 100        Natural Sciences Lecture                   (3) [P]                
This course provides lectures relating to concepts presented in first year courses in Natural Sciences. It is intended for students needing to fulfill the general education requirements in General Sciences. Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
NSCI 100L     Natural Sciences Lab                          (1) [P]                 
This laboratory course provides experiments and exercises relating to concepts presented in first year courses in Natural Sciences. It is intended for students needing to fulfill the general education requirements in General Sciences. Permission of Instructor.


Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 100       Critical Reasoning                               (3) [H]                
Arguments, premises, conclusions, deduction, validity, truth fallacies, categorical logic, Boolean logic, syllogisms, Venn diagrams, symbolic logic, truth tables, and proof.

PHIL 101       Introduction to Philosophy                 (3) [H]                
An introduction to basic doctrines and concepts in philosophy through an analytical reading of selections from the writings of Western philosophers who have had a major impact on the development of philosophical discourse.  The course also addresses the relationship of philosophy to the development of other disciplines, such as theology, history, politics, social science, science, and literature.  Some of the perennial issues in philosophy are identified and discussed.
                                                                                                                    
PHIL 201       Medieval Arabic Philosophy              (3) [H]                
Survey of the works of major philosophers in Islam, such as Al-Ghazali, Ibn Rushd, the Sufis, and others.  Course will include analysis of their religious and philosophical doctrines.
                                                                                                                    
PHIL 203       Professional Ethics                              (3) [H]                
This course examines ethical debates facing individuals in the professional work-place. This course will examine the ethical nature of various professional relationships, including between employer and employee, client and business, colleagues and issues of transparency. Questions surrounding the duties of report writing, ethical obligations regarding report writing, environmental duties, etc. are also discussed. The objective of the course is to provide students with a critical understanding of the ethical issues in their professional lives.
                                                                                                                    
PHIL 280       International Ethics                            (3) [H]                
This course raises ethical questions in a global or international context. Questions of cross-cultural, conflicting values are of particular concern in this course. Specific topics may include: the theoretical bases for human rights, ethical questions of social or political identity, individual versus the state, immigration and refugee issues as well as ethical issues surrounding the environment and globalization. The objective of this course is to improve student's critical awareness and reasoning about ethical issues in a global context. Pre-requisite: ENGL 101
                                                                                                                    
PHIL 310       Environmental Ethics                         (3) [H]                
This course examines normative issues in the study of the environment.  Students will learn basic ethical concepts and theories and how to apply them to specific environmental concerns. Students will be asked to develop arguments to defend their own respective views regarding the environment and to develop viewpoints reflecting thoughtful and scholarly consideration of human duties, both individual and social, to the environment. Cross-listed with ENVS 310. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
PHIL 311       Modern Western Philosophy              (3) [H]                
Review of modern Western Philosophy of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. It explores issues of science, politics and culture and the impact of the Industrial Revolution. The course covers philosophy of science, pragmatism, utilitarianism, Darwinism and Marxism. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: PHIL 101.
                                                                                                                    
PHIL 322       Western Political Philosophy             (3) [H]                
Students will examine historical and contemporary political and social theories. This examination has the objective of increasing students' critical understanding of the theoretical bases for much of today's socio-political structures and beliefs. Historical and contemporary theories include the works of Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Machiavelli, Confucius, Gandhi, Marx, Mill, Rawls and Nozick. Cross-listed with PLSC 322. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisites: PHIL 101 or previous INST/PLSC and ENGL 101.
                                                                                                                    
PHIL 350       Metaphysics                                          (3) [H]                
Metaphysics is the study of "what is." This course introduces students to major metaphysical theories from the pre-Socratics to contemporary theories. Students will analyze the major metaphysical theories as well as develop their own justifications for their metaphysical beliefs. Topics covered may include: The existence of qualia, mid/body distinction, proofs for the existence of God and the nature of substances. Historical figures covered may include Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Sartre, Quine and Kripke. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites: Any PHIL course and ENGL 102.
                                                                                                                    
PHIL 388       Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

PHIL 389       Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic.

PHIL 403       Advanced Business Ethics                  (3)                       
This course examines ethical debates facing individuals working in professional fields. Topics covered may include: ethical treatment of employees by employers, ethical treatment of employer by philanthropic duties in the workplace and ethical duties of businesses to clients and vice versa. This course will also address issues surrounding corporate environmental and social obligations.

Physics (PHYS)

PHYS 101       Introduction to Physics I                    (4) [P]                
This course is an introductory physics course for non-science majors. The course focuses on basic physics concepts and connections to everyday life in fields of mechanics and thermodynamics. Course topics include motion in one dimension, projectile motion, Newton's Laws of force, work, energy, circular motion, momentum, and heat and thermodynamics. A required laboratory that offers experiments in basic physics concepts is part of this course.
                                                                                                                    
PHYS 102       Introduction to Physics II                   (4) [P]                
This course is an introductory physics course for non-science majors. The course focuses on basic physics concepts and connections to everyday life in fields of electricity, magnetism, and optics. Course topics include electrostatic force and field, electromagnetism, DC and AC circuits, light and optical devices, and mirror and lenses. A required laboratory that offers experiments in basic physics concepts is part of this course.
                                                                                                                    
PHYS 105       Environmental Physics                       (3) [P]                
A one-semester course designed to explore the basic physical principles of light, heat and energy in the natural environment.  Several key aspects of physics in the environment will be covered including energy (forms, conservation, sources and use), energy from fossil fuel, heat and the laws of thermodynamics, pollution of the atmosphere, environmental safety of nuclear energy and alternative sources of energy.
                                                                                                                    
PHYS 107       Life in the Universe                             (3) [P]                
This course is an inter-disciplinary science course which explores our role in the Universe, starting here on Earth where the very definition of "life" derives, to wondrous worlds in our Solar System and finally to the great divide of interstellar space. The quest for life is the search for who we are and why we are here. The course topics will cover different areas of physics, chemistry, biology and geology.
                                                                                                                    
PHYS 110       Introduction to Astronomy                  (3) [P]                
This course is a one semester introduction to astronomy. The course describes various important phenomena in astronomy, the physical principles underlying these phenomena, and methods of observing and interpreting them.  Course topics include the principles of motion, universal gravitation, orbital motion, the nature of light and the operation of telescopes. Topics in astronomy include stellar astronomy, celestial coordinates, the Solar System, the Sun, the eight planets, and our Galaxy.
                                                                                                                    
PHYS 115       General Physics I                                 (4) [P]                
An Introductory calculus based course covering motion in one dimension, projectile motion, Newton's laws of force, concepts of work, energy and momentum, circular motion and rotational dynamics with laws of conservation of energy and angular momentum. A required laboratory that offers experiments in mechanics, momentum, work and energy is part of this course. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 103 or MATH 110.
                                                                                                                    
PHYS 116       General Physics II                               (4) [P]                
The second semester of calculus-based physics covers electromagnetic wave theory, AC and RC circuits, magnetic theory and applications to magnetic storage devices, electromagnetic induction and optical phenomena with applications to optical devices.  A required laboratory is part of this course with experiments in oscillatory motion, electricity, magnetism, and basic optics.  Prerequisite: PHYS 115.
                                                                                                                    
PHYS 212       Classical Mechanics                            (3) [P]                
A calculus-based general physics course.  Includes kinematics, conservation of momentum, elastic and inelastic collisions, the scalar product, Newton's Law of Gravitation, conservation forces and law, Kepler's Laws, circular motion, equilibrium and elasticity, laws, projectiles, angular momentum, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, energy, temperature, heat and the first law of thermodynamics, sound and mechanical waves. Prerequisite PHYS 115
                                                                                                                    
PHYS 216       Electricity and Magnetism                (3) [P]                
An introduction to the basic principles of electricity and magnetism including the contributions of Gauss, Faraday, Ampere, Maxwell, and others; capacitance, dc circuits, magnetic fields; electromagnetic propagation, antenna design, microwaves, radio wave transmission and reception, etc. Prerequisite PHYS 116.
                                                                                                                    
PHYS 312       Modern Physics                                    (3) [P]                
An introduction to the history and nature of quantum mechanics; special theory of relativity; basic introduction to nuclear and elementary particle physics; discussion of classical laws, their modification and replacement to account for the behavior of atoms, subatomic particles, and matter at the macroscopic level; lasers, flux quantization. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: PHYS 116.
                                                                                                                    
PHYS 388      Independent Study                               (1 - 4)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

PHYS 389      Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

Political Science (PLSC)

PLSC 200       Introduction to Political Science       (3) [S]                 
An investigation into the nature of government and politics; exploration of the basic philosophies, principles, and concepts of governance, and of the structures and processes of political systems. Topics include the structure and function of states, forms of government, public administration, the nature and character of domestic, foreign, and national security policy, relations between states, the international system and international organizations.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 201       Introduction to Public Administration                         (3) [S]    
A course on the nature of public administration. Basic concepts, processes, and approaches in the field of public administration are introduced so that the student will develop a sense of appreciation for the role of public administration in modern society.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 202       International Relations                       (3) [S]                 
An examination of the basic factors and conditions which determine or influence relations among governments and states. Analysis of conflict and cooperation in a rapidly-changing world; impact of non-state actors and international organizations such as the United Nations; determinants of foreign policy; and sources of national economic and political power. Some attention is paid to contemporary developments including the post-Cold War unipolar order.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 203       Comparative Politics                           (3) [S]                 
Analysis of how varied Western and other polities address the enduring problems of order, political responsiveness, political change, and the legitimacy of government structures.  The course includes the comparative investigation of the relationships between the individual, social groups, and the state.  Issues of individual freedom and collective responsibility are also addressed.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 204       International Political Economy       (3) [S]                 
An examination of the interaction between politics and economies in international affairs. The course includes the effect of economic conditions on foreign military and security policy, and the impact of foreign and military policies on economic relations.  Topics also include imperialism, globalization, regional economic systems and international economic institutions such as the WTO, World Bank and International Monetary Fund.  Prerequisite: INST 101 or PLSC 200
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 207       International Relations of Arab States                          (3) [S]    
Historical and contemporary analysis of the foreign policies of Arab States.  Intra-Arab state relations; the Arab League; Euro-Arab relations, US-Arab relations, Arab-East Asian relations and Arab-African relations.  Prerequisite: INST 101
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 210       Methods of Research in Political Science                    (3) [S]    
Introduction to scientific method, data gathering, research design, statistical analysis, and computer applications for international relations and comparative studies research.  The course develops analytical skills that students need as active consumers of research findings. Cross-listed with INST 210. Prerequisite: INST 101 or PLSC 202.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 302       Public Policy                                        (3) [S]                 
A survey of concepts and issues in public policy. This course acquaints the student with basic theoretical frameworks for the study and analysis of policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. This course also examines closely the application of these concepts, frameworks, and criteria in selected policy areas. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: PLSC 200 or PLSC 201.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 303       Politics of Postindustrial Societies    (3) [S]                 
Comparative study of postindustrial society; public policy and policy-making; domestic and foreign policy; politics and economics of welfare states; and political participation and oppositional movements in postindustrial societies. The course assesses the impact of technology, science, the information revolution and national and international social movements on politics. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: PLSC 200.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 304       Arab Politics                                         (3) [S]                 
The course investigates contemporary Arab political culture, its historical, economic, geographic, ideological and social roots, dynamics of Arab nationalism and political Islam. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: PLSC 200.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 306       Global Political Economy                   (3) [S]                 
This course surveys various theorists and theorists such as Marx, Polyani, rational choice, public choice, and the new institutionalism. It focuses on three major themes: globalization, North-North relations (among developed states), and North-South relations (among developed countries of the North and developing countries of the South). Considerable attention is devoted to the transition economies of China, Eastern Europe, and countries of the former Soviet Union. Sophomore standing.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 315       American Government                        (3) [S]                 
Structure and function of the American governmental system; the constitutional bases of government; federal, state and local government systems; intra-governmental relations; the Presidency and the Executive Branch, the Supreme Court and Congress, and the role of business, industry, non-governmental agencies and interest groups.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: PLSC 200.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 316       Political and Social Forces in the U.S.                          (3) [S]    
An overview of the social bases of politics in the U.S.; political participation and elections; political parties, special interests, the role of religion in politics; public opinion and the major national institutions influencing the making and implementation of domestic and foreign policy. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: PLSC 200.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 317       Government and Politics of Kuwait  (3) [S]                 
Analysis of the contemporary political institutions and behavior of the Kuwaiti political system; an overview of political participation and elections; the relationship among the executive, legislative and judicial branches; the major national institutions involved in domestic and foreign policy-making. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: PLSC 200.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 321       Islamic Political Philosophy              (3) [S]                 
A survey of Islamic political thought from the time of the Prophet Mohammad until the present. Investigation of the development and evolution of institutions in the Islamic state; Ibn Khaldoun's views on history, society and the state. Theories of the state, including contemporary Shi'i and Sunni thought are also addressed.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 322       Western Political Theory                    (3) [S]                 
A survey of Western political thought from ancient times to the present.  Analysis of major themes such as the relationship of the individual to the state, political authority, political legitimacy, cooperation and conflict, and political change through the works of Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and contemporary political theorists such as Rawls. Cross-listed with PHIL 322. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisites: PHIL 101 or previous INST/PLSC and ENGL 101.

PLSC 327       Comparative Ethnicity, Identity, and Ethnic Conflict  (3) [S] 
Comparative examination of the complex configuration of identity, identity politics, ethnicity, and the role of race, religion, culture and nationalism in ethnic identity, population, migration, and ethnic politics and conflict.  The rise of ethnic conflict globally. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: PLSC 200.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 333       Organization Theory                           (3) [S]                 
A course that explores the major debates, both theoretical and applied, that frame contemporary discussions about organizing in the public and nonprofit sectors.  The course introduces organization theories about public organizations and the basic methods to study organizational behavior in non-private spheres. Cross-listed with MGMT 333.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: PLSC 201.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 334       E-government                                       (3) [S]                 
This course explores the impact of information and communication technology on information management, government decision-making and communication, service delivery, and public policy in the public sector.  Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: PLSC 201.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 335       Current Trends in Public Administration                    (3) [S]    
A course that deals with the contemporary transformation of the public sector and its relationship with government and society. This course evaluates managerialism in the public sector, privatization, and entrepreneurial government. Sophomore standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: PLSC 200 or PLSC 201.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 369       Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

PLSC 388       Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
A research and writing project to be determined in consultation with the Instructor. Can be repeated for credit with different topic.  Senior standing or Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
PLSC 389       Special Topics                                       (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit. Senior standing or Permission of Instructor.


Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 101        Introduction to Psychology                (3) [S]                 
General Psychology introduces students to principles of human behavior.  It explores individual differences in personality development, emotion, sensory functions and perceptions, learning, as well as psychopathology and clinical interventions.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 200       Research Design and Methods          (4) [S]                 
An introduction to research design and methods in psychology and statistical applications. The course provides an overview of experimental and quasi-experimental methods, principles of measurement, correlational and observational methods, surveys and content analyses, and the applications of descriptive and inferential statistics. Includes laboratory component. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 and STAT 201, or permission of instructor.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 202       Developmental Psychology                (3) [S]                 
This course is an introduction to human development from infancy through death, focusing on the interactions of personal and environmental factors in the development of perception, language, cognition, and sociality.  Topics include developmental theories, infant perception, attachment, the development of language and memory; identity transitions; and peer relations, schools, families and communities as the contexts of life-cycle changes.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 203       Social Psychology                                 (3) [S]                 
This course introduces students to theory and research about the dynamics of individuals and social groups.  It includes studies of how we perceive ourselves and others, how we form our beliefs, judgments, and attitudes, social influences such as cultural or gender expectations, persuasion and pressures to conform, as well as our social relations, whether prejudicial, aggressive, intimate or helpful.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 204       Abnormal Psychology                          (3) [S]                 
This course orients students to a range of behaviors classified as "abnormal", and to theories and research about the dynamics, diagnoses and treatments of neuroses, psychoses, character disorders, psychosomatic reactions, and other abnormal personality patterns.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 235       Child & Adolescent Psychology        (3) [S]                 
This course introduces the principles and theories of child development, from infancy through adolescence. It is a study of the physiological, cognitive, emotional and social changes that children go through within the socio-cultural context of their environment.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 332       Personality Theories                            (3) [S]                 
This course provides an understanding of theories and research from each of the major approaches to the study of personality; psychoanalytic, learning, cognitive, dispositional, humanistic, and intervention strategies derived from these approaches. Offered Fall term only. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite:  PSYC 101.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 335       Psychology of Addictions                    (3) [S]                 
This course assesses theory and research about the social impact, causes, characteristics, and treatment of addictions, including alcohol and drug addictions and eating disorders. Offered Spring term only. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 365       Marriage and Family Therapy           (3) [S]                 
This course introduces students to treatment within the major models of family and couple therapy in Kuwait. Basic assumptions, major issues, primary theorists and techniques of each model will be considered, including working with diverse families and couples. This course is seminar based and its primary focus will be in-class discussions and the sharing of different opinions and ideas. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 369       Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers.  Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

PSYC 388       Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
This course is open only for students who minor in Psychology. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 and PSYC 200.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 389       Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

PSYC 440       Cognitive Psychology                          (3)                       
This course offers current perspectives on how people acquire, represent, transform, and use verbal and nonverbal information. Topics include perception, attention, memory, action, thinking, language and representations of knowledge. Junior Standing. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 442       Sensation and Perception                   (3)                       
In this course, students evaluate how we acquire information about the physical and social world through basic sensory systems, including vision, smell, hearing, and touch, and the impact of such sensations on our perceptions of objects, events and human interactions. Junior Standing or Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite:  PSYC 101.
                                                                                                                    
PSYC 470       Internship in Psychology                    (1 - 3)                  
An Internship experience with the requirement that the student write a report summarizing what the internship job added to his to her knowledge of Psychology.  Students are limited to a maximum of 6 internship credit hours. This is a Pass/Fail course.  Junior Standing and Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: A Minimum Grade point Average of 2.0.

PSYC 475       Current Issues                                       (3)                       
Seminar on current research, theory and applications of psychological principles.  Offered Fall term only. Junior Standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

Religion (RELG)

RELG 101      Introduction to Islamic Studies         (3) [H]                
Analysis of the structure and dynamics of the Islamic belief system, including law, traditions, culture and society.  Original readings illustrating the classical Islamic paradigm are assigned.  Contemporary issues of reform, renewal, modernization and fundamentalism, as well as contemporary debates among Muslims are addressed.
                                                                                                                    
RELG 315      Religions of the World                         (3) [H]                
Review and analysis of major religions of the world, including varieties of Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Comparative social organization of religion and religious practices, currents in religious transformations; the rise of fundamentalism in the late twentieth century, and the role of religion in social, political and economic life are included.
                                                                                                                    
RELG 369      Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

RELG 388      Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

RELG 389      Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Selected topics of interest in religion. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.


Social And Behavioral Sciences (SBSA)

SBSA 101  Introduction to Social and Behavioral Sciences, Concentration in Anthropology (3)[S] 
An introduction to the study of human society from a multicultural perspective. The course covers such topics as language, food, economics, political systems, religion, art, kinship and descent, gender, marriage and family, health, and cultural change.  A prerequisite for many SBSA courses.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 200        Ethnographic and Research Methods                          (3) [S]    
An introduction to ethnographic fieldwork and research design.  The course covers both issues that confront researchers in the field as well as the methodology used to collect data.  Among the methods to be presented are interviews with individuals, focus groups, surveys and questionnaires, data analysis and presentation.  Students will have the opportunity to learn by doing.  Prerequisite: SBSA 101.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 205        Fundamentals of Arab Society            (3) [K], [S]          
An overview of the structure of Arab society and its diversity. The course covers the relationship between environment and culture, the impact of history and religion on regional values, and the three basic subsistence strategies: Bedouin nomad, agricultural villager, and urban dweller. It also provides examples of social and cultural change.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 210        Arab Society and Culture                    (3) [K], [S]          
This course explores the complexity and diversity of Arab society in its socio-cultural aspects.  Among the topics to be covered are family life, gender roles, political culture and the military, economics, education, media, the arts, and the Arab communities in Europe and America.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 214        Lost Worlds                                           (3) [S]                 
Explores various societies around the world known largely through the material remains uncovered by archaeology.  Includes societies such as that of ancient Egypt, the Nabateans, the Mayans and Incas of the Americas, Easter Island, and Paleolithic sites in Europe and the Middle East.  Briefly covers archeological methods and controversies such as ownership of artifacts, looting of sites, and conservation needs.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 218        Museums as Artifacts                          (3) [S]                 
The course examines how and why museums represent and reflect cultures in their exhibitions and public programming.  Among the topics to be considered are the development of museums, their organization, funding, and purpose, exhibit display styles, educational activities, audience evaluation techniques, and the ethics of collecting. Museum visits will be an integral part of the course.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 220        Culture and Visual Arts                       (3) [S]                 
Examines visual arts of both tribal and complex societies in terms of cultural symbolism, and their political, economic, social and gender contexts. Includes such arts as cave painting, textiles, gardens, jewelry, architecture, sand painting, tattooing, funerary artifacts, and murals.  Includes discussion of issues such as commercializing, looting, and repatriation.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 222        Global Media and Spaces of Identity                            (3) [S]    
Anthropology of media is an essential area of study, living as we do, in a media saturated world today. The course examines new paradigms in the anthropology of visual communication in looking at how media interacts with issues such as representation, people's sense of self-identity and collective cultural identities, nationalism and transnationalism, media activism, diasporas, and social engagements with technology. The course locates the anthropological voice in media by locating it in worlds of practice and debate.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 224        Shopping and Consumerism               (3) [S]                 
This course focuses on how consumers negotiate desire, difference and power in the most seemingly commonplace material consumption and tries to decode the culture of consumption and what shopping says about people. The course traces the historical development of the relationship between goods and identity from the eighteenth century and identifies the systems of inequality that have been reproduced (as well as subverted) through material consumption. Students learn how social reality is constituted in an environment steeped in global consumer imagery; and are armed with analytical techniques to probe the social and ideological meanings invested in goods, thereby also gaining a critical, self-reflective perspective on cultural differences.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 226        Material Culture of Clothing             (3)                       
The course examines material culture in the form of clothing: how dress expresses culture in its social, economic, political, religious, and ritual dimensions. Also explored is the way clothing reflects social ideas about gender and ethnic differences, cultural change, and historical development. Dress is analyzed in both its symbolic and international aspects in the form of the couture houses of Paris and the film industry in California.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 230        Genocide and Refugees                       (3) [S]                 
A critical, historical approach to contemporary studies of genocide and refugees, in relation to colonialism, power, domination, ideology, identity, resources such as oil, media and propaganda, and revenge.  Students will assess the destruction and survival of societies, from the 19th century slaughter of Amazonian Indians to more recent genocides in Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda and the Sudan.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 235        Identity, Difference, and Deviance   (3) [S]                 
A critical, historical assessment of concepts of abnormality and deviancy as they emerge across time and cultures. The course covers longstanding debates about the relations of human nature and culture from 19th century measurements of "primitives" and "freaks" to contemporary studies of mental illnesses, witchcraft, affliction and spirit possession, drug and alcohol abuse, moral panics, social control, outlawed deviancy, and acceptable forms of deviancy.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 239        Nations and Migration                        (3) [S]                 
Mobility, a key feature of contemporary life, has led to fundamental changes in our understanding of identity, culture and community. Drawing on an inter-disciplinary range of debates,  the course examines how, while nationalism and migration might be seen as opposing processes, migration often leads to reinvigoration and rephrasing of national identity, frequently with important political consequences. The course also discusses the range of phenomena that make up the "endless motion" of migration that shapes our everyday experiences.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 249        Images of Women in Media                (3) [S]                 
In examining links between gender, media and modernity, this course offers examples of media representations of women's identity. Students will not simply analyze media representations of women, but learn to contextualize and critically examine them within a broader framework of the characteristics of contemporary culture in specific regions.  This course will "cross borders" of disciplines, methods, and approaches, and intervene into current debates in the fields of cultural anthropology, media and cultural studies; global/local; Euro-centrism and multiculturalism.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 255        Health, Medicine and Curing            (3) [S]                 
Analyzes the socio-cultural factors and the global forces that compose health, medicine and curing. Critically explores health care consequences of inequality and the connection between power and medical knowledge particularly in Western bio-medicine. The topic covers how different people socially construct and manage well-being and illness, and examines the role of healers (e.g. physicians, shamans, and mid-wives) in cultural context.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 260        Ethnographic Film                              (3) [S]                 
A survey of historical and contemporary trends in ethnographic films and film-making.  This course explores the use of film in anthropological analysis, documentation, and representation, and the technical limitations and ethical issues encountered by ethnographic filmmakers. We will screen and discuss films that portray the lives of diverse people and communities.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 265        South Asian Film: A Global Perspective                       (3) [S]    
The Indian film industry is the largest in the world, of which Hindi films is its most popular component. This course uses popular Hindi films as anthropological texts through which we consider broader questions about the anthropology of representations ¿ in examining roles and representations of femininity and masculinity, tradition and modernity, the importance of family and family values, the Indian diaspora, and the Hindi film phenomenon as it develops in the age of globalization. In this course we treat visual representation as an aspect of material culture and practice of social scientists, as well as culture researched by social scientists.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 270        The Indigenous Americas                   (3) [S]                 
This module of the Indigenous Americas introduces students to the cultures of South America through historical and ethnographic study. It is designed to give students a general understanding of some of the core issues of a large and complex geo-political area. We will explore the shifting cultural, political and economic relations from the colonial period to contemporary times. The course will pay particular attention to the place of indigenous people in the national and international context.

SBSA 275        Secrecy and Secret Societies               (3) [S]                 
Analyzes the keeping and telling of secrets in everyday life and the meanings they have in different cultures. Surveys anthropological and social science theories on the role of secrecy and secret societies and associated effects on identity, politics and culture. The course examines the character of secrecy in ancient and modern social institutions and studies the historical conditions giving rise to secret societies.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 280        Kinship & Families-Global Era         (3) [S]                 
Surveys the anthropological history of kinship and explores the way global processes have changed or challenged family bonds. The course analyzes the impact of technologies, migration and the global economy on personal relationship.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 341        Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective                          (3) [S]    
Explores the biological and cultural basis of gender, examines the factors that influence the relative status of men and women, and investigates the relationship between gender and such fields as politics, economics, health, violence, the family, and the media. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 342        Gender Relations in the Arab World (3) [K]                
The course considers the relationship between men and women in the Arab world, as well as the impact on gender of social structure, family dynamics, religion, law, education, economics, health, aging, politics, and the arts. Also examined is the symbolic communication of gender through the media and dress. Additional topics include the challenges that Arab women confront when conducting anthropological research in the region.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 344        Tourism and Cultural Change           (3) [S]                 
Analyzes tourism from a cultural perspective. Explores issues such as the impact of tourism on the environment and society, culture as a commodity, authenticity, touristic imagery, material aspects of tourism such as souvenirs, gender roles in tourism, and exploitation. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: SBSA 101.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 345        Globalization: In its Defense and its Discontents       (3) [S]    
The course provides an anthropological and ethnographic introduction to globalization and a world of flows and interconnections. We will focus on how through globalizing processes, peoples and cultures are becoming increasingly interconnected, and also on ways how people in different parts of the world mediate these processes in culturally specific ways. Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: SBSA 101.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 350        Health, Medicine and Curing            (3) [S]                 
Analyzes the socio-cultural factors and the global forces that compose health, medicine and curing. Critically explores health care consequences of inequality and the connection between power and medical knowledge particularly in Western bio-medicine. The topic covers how different people socially construct and manage well-being and illness, and examines the role of healers (e.g. physicians, shamans, and mid-wives) in cultural context.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 366        Popular Culture in South Asia: Film and Beyond       (3) [S]    
In this course, popular culture is examined - ranging from calendar art, romance fiction, magazines, photographs, music, food, fashion, films, and television – as an important resource for anthropological insights into contemporary social issues and processes.  Issues such as continuity and transformation of tradition, the impact of imperialism, and the "Indianization" of English are increasingly seen as areas of debate and research.  Notions of hybridity, diversity, and globalization are addressed.  Sophomore Standing or Permission of Instructor. It is recommended that students take SBSA 265 prior to this course.  Prerequisite: SBSA 101.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 368        Technology and Culture                     (3) [S]                 
This course explores the effect of technology on culture.  We examine the dynamism between technology, politics and identity in different social contexts.  Three areas are considered:  How biotechnologies challenge definitions of humanness, how information technologies shape identities and how infrastructural technologies reflect political ideologies.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 369        Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers.  Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

SBSA 370        Music of the Arabian Peninsula        (3) [K], [S]          
This course deals with music, dance, and poetic genres of Kuwait and regions of the Arabian Peninsula.  It includes structural analysis and an examination of the context in which these creative forms exist.  This course satisfies the General Education Requirement for Arab Culture. Cross-listed with MUSC 370. Sophomore Standing and Permission of Instructor.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 372        Anthropology of Business                   (3) [S]                 
This course focuses on the application of anthropology in business. Access to meaningful information is often the difference between success and failure. Anthropological methods, by focusing on a holistic approach, qualitative data, and ethnographic analyses provide information in ways that traditional business simply cannot. Anthropology plays a critical role in understanding and analyzing diverse business and organizational issues in different societies and cultures, where cultural awareness and sensitivity is critical for successful business ventures. Sophomore Standing. Pre-requisite: SBSA 101.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 388        Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

SBSA 389        Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

SBSA 470        Internship in Social & Behavioral Sciences, Conc. Anthropology      (1 - 3)
An Internship experience to apply the knowledge acquired in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, concentration Anthropology Program.  A maximum of three (3) internship credits hours can be applied to the SBSA degree program. Permission of Instructor is required.
                                                                                                                    
SBSA 485        Seminar in Social & Behavioral Sciences, Conc. in Anthropology      (3)      

A Senior seminar that examines selected critical issues in the field of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Concentration in Anthropology. Senior Standing or Permission of Instructor.


Free Electives Under Any Sciences Discipline

SCEL 473       Internship for Free Elective Sciences & Engineering (1 - 3)

Free Electives Under Any Social Sciences Discipline

SOEL 473      Internship for Free Elective Social Sciences               (1 - 3)    

Supervised experience designed to enhance intellectual development through appreciation of knowledge outside the academy.  Requirements include:  weekly journals, and final report explaining what the internship added to the student's knowledge in an approved discipline.  A Pass/No Pass course requiring Junior Standing and Permission of Instructor.  Prerequisite: Minimum GPA of 2.00.

Spanish (SPAN)

SPAN 101       Introduction to Spanish I                    (3) [H]                
The course is designed for beginners. The objective is to provide students with necessary skills in oral and written communication. The class is taught almost entirely in Spanish.
                                                                                                                    
SPAN 102       Introduction to Spanish II                  (3) [H]                
Introduction to Spanish II continues to reinforce communicating skills with an emphasis placed on speaking (acquisition of vocabulary for personal and practical use).  It will develop the ability to communicate with accurate pronunciation and intonation.  Students will be exposed to the Spanish and Latin American culture with the use of video and other authentic material.  The course content is built with a variety of methods and formats to suit the needs of learners.  The class is conducted almost entirely in Spanish.  Students may not enroll and will not receive credit for a language-learning course taken below the level of the language-learning course into which they were tested. Permission of Instructor. Prerequisites:  SPAN 101.
                                                                                                                    
SPAN 201       Intermediate Spanish                          (3) [H]                
Intermediate Spanish continues to reinforce active communicating skills with more emphasis placed on reading and writing texts but it will continue to extend speaking skills in daily life situations.  Students will be exposed to the Spanish and Latin American culture with the use of video and other authentic material.  The course content is built with a variety of methods and formats to suit the needs of learners.  At this level, the class is conducted entirely in Spanish.  Students may not enroll and will not receive credit for a language-learning course taken below the level of the language-learning course into which they were tested. Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: SPAN 102.
                       
SPAN 202      Intermediate Spanish II                      (3) [H]                
While still focusing on oral communication, more emphasis will be placed on reading short texts and writing short paragraphs. Students will develop a strong knowledge of Spanish grammar (verbs in present, past, future and subjunctive), and a strong vocabulary base. Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite SPAN 201.
                                                                                                                    
SPAN 333      Language and Culture                        (3)                       
This is an advanced language course that improves student’s oral, reading and writing skills through an examination of Spanish society. Themes covered include family, education, arts, gastronomy, politics and immigration. Class discussion will be based on literary readings, songs, and movies. Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisite: SPAN 202.
                                                                                                                    
SPAN 369      Short Course                                          (1 - 3)                  
Topic varies by semester. Classes are taught by a guest lecturer or lecturers. Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

SPAN 388      Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of Instructor.

SPAN 389      Special Topics                                       (3)                       
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of instructor.

SPAN 399      Spanish Study Abroad                          (3)                       
This course is an option for students who wish to achieve fluency and an understanding of life in Spain. Students will study in Spanish speaking environment. Many courses assignments will take place out of a traditional classroom setting and students will be required to interact with native speakers every day. Permission of Instructor. Pre-requisite: SPAN 101.


Statistics (STAT)

STAT 201       Statistics                                                 (3) [M]               
Topics include data classification, means, measures of central tendency and dispersion, frequency distributions, probability, sampling distributions, point and interval estimates, hypothesis testing, non-parametric techniques, simple regression and correlation.  Computer-based statistical packages are utilized. Prerequisite: MATH 100 or by placement test.
                                                                                                                    
STAT 202       Regression for Business                      (3) [M]               
This course extends Statistics 201 to include estimation, hypothesis tests concerning one and two populations, statistical inference, Chi-square tests, simple and multiple regressions and model building.  Prerequisite: STAT 201.
                                                                                                                    
STAT 214       Statistics for Engineers                       (3) [M]               
Students will be given an in-depth exposure to proofs of statistical formulas and theorems.  Topics for study will include counting methods, probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, density functions, expectation, moments and moment generating functions, sampling distributions and the Central Limit Theorem, point and interval estimations, hypothesis testing, unbiased estimators, consistency, sufficiency, robustness, regression and correlation.  Prerequisite: MATH 203.
                                                                                                                    
STAT 388       Independent Study                               (1 - 3)                  
Can be repeated for credit with different topic. Permission of instructor.