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datatime: 2022-10-04 05:42:59 Author:zOHIQzYQ

Yes," said the mother, with a smile full of meaning.

THE ENGLISH VISITOR.

The imposing inspector came up to the gate and read the pass thathad been given to Nekhludoff and the Englishman by the light ofthe lamp, shrugged his fine shoulders in surprise, but, inobedience to the order, asked the visitors to follow him in. Heled them through the courtyard and then in at a door to the rightand up a staircase into the office. He offered them a seat andasked what he could do for them, and when he heard thatNekhludoff would like to see Maslova at once, he sent a jailer tofetch her. Then he prepared himself to answer the questions whichthe Englishman began to put to him, Nekhludoff acting asinterpreter.

After having repeatedly expressed his admiration of the children,thereby at least partially satisfying their mother, who eagerlydrank in this praise, he followed her back to the drawingroom,where the Englishman was waiting for him to go and visit theprison, as they had arranged. Having taken leave of their hosts,the old and the young ones, the Englishman and Nekhludoff wentout into the porch of the General's house.

The postoffice was a lowvaulted room. Several officials satbehind a counter serving the people, of whom there was quite acrowd. One official sat with his head bent to one side and keptstamping the envelopes, which he slipped dexterously under thestamp. Nekhludoff had not long to wait. As soon as he had givenhis name, everything that had come for him by post was at oncehanded to him. There was a good deal: letters, and money, andbooks, and the last number of Fatherland Notes. Nekhludoff tookall these things to a wooden bench, on which a soldier with abook in his hand sat waiting for something, took the seat by hisside, and began sorting the letters. Among them was oneregistered letter in a fine envelope, with a distinctly stampedbright red seal. He broke the seal, and seeing a letter fromSelenin and some official paper inside the envelope, he felt theblood rush to his face, and his heart stood still. It was theanswer to Katusha's petition. What would that answer be?Nekhludoff glanced hurriedly through the letter, written in anillegibly small, hard, and cramped hand, and breathed a sigh ofrelief. The answer was a favourable one.

In the third room four were ill. When the Englishman asked whythe sick were not put all together into one cell, the inspectorsaid that they did not wish it themselves, that their diseaseswere not infectious, and that the medical assistant watched themand attended to them.

Directly," replied Nekhludoff and asked her about Kryltzoff.

Nekhludoff looked up and was surprised to find himself where hewas. The Englishman had finished his notes and expressed a wishto see the cells.

After having repeatedly expressed his admiration of the children,thereby at least partially satisfying their mother, who eagerlydrank in this praise, he followed her back to the drawingroom,where the Englishman was waiting for him to go and visit theprison, as they had arranged. Having taken leave of their hosts,the old and the young ones, the Englishman and Nekhludoff wentout into the porch of the General's house.

Nekhludoff recalled to his mind chains, shaved heads, fightingdebauchery, the dying Kryltzoff, Katusha and the whole of herpast, and he began to feel envious and to wish for what he sawhere, which now seemed to him pure and refined happiness.

Am I to go?" she asked, noticing that the Englishman waswaiting.

What a good woman you are," he said.

She said just what he had been telling himself a few momentsbefore, but he no longer thought so now and felt verydifferently. He was not only ashamed, but felt sorry to lose allhe was losing with her. "I did not expect this," he said.

I good?" she said through her tears, and a pathetic smile lit upher face.

She interrupted him hurriedly. "What have I to consider? WhereValdemar Simonson goes, there I shall follow." In spite of theexcitement she was in she raised her eyes to Nekhludoff's andpronounced these words quickly and distinctly, as if she hadprepared what she had to say.

Why should you live here and suffer? You have suffered enough."

She said just what he had been telling himself a few momentsbefore, but he no longer thought so now and felt verydifferently. He was not only ashamed, but felt sorry to lose allhe was losing with her. "I did not expect this," he said.

MASLOVA'S DECISION.

He has not set foot here for a fortnight," muttered a voice.

Nekhludoff wrote down the names.

She got over her emotion and quietly told him all she knew.Kryltzoff was very weak and had been sent into the infirmary.Mary Pavlovna was very anxious, and had asked to be allowed to goto the infirmary as a nurse, but could not get the permission.

Nekhludoff wrote down the names.

He has not set foot here for a fortnight," muttered a voice.

THE SENTENCE COMMUTED.

Loving or not loving, what does it matter? I have given up allthat. And then Valdemar Simonson is quite an exceptional man."

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