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Release date: 2022-08-20 13:45:13 Author:Porcelain capital Communist Youth League

M.ANTONY, TriumvirOCTAVIUS CAESAR, TriumvirAEMIL. LEPIDUS, TriumvirSEXTUS POMPEIUS TriumvirDOMITIUS ENOBARBUS, friend to AntonyVENTIDIUS, friend to AntonyEROS, friend to AntonySCARUS, friend to AntonyDERCETAS, friend to AntonyDEMETRIUS, friend to AntonyPHILO, friend to AntonyMAECENAS, friend to CaesarAGRIPPA, friend to CaesarDOLABELLA, friend to CaesarPROCULEIUS, friend to CaesarTHYREUS, friend to CaesarGALLUS, friend to CaesarMENAS, friend to PompeyMENECRATES, friend to PompeyVARRIUS, friend to PompeyTAURUS, Lieutenant-General to CaesarCANIDIUS, Lieutenant-General to AntonySILIUS, an Officer in Ventidius

M.ANTONY, TriumvirOCTAVIUS CAESAR, TriumvirAEMIL. LEPIDUS, TriumvirSEXTUS POMPEIUS TriumvirDOMITIUS ENOBARBUS, friend to AntonyVENTIDIUS, friend to AntonyEROS, friend to AntonySCARUS, friend to AntonyDERCETAS, friend to AntonyDEMETRIUS, friend to AntonyPHILO, friend to AntonyMAECENAS, friend to CaesarAGRIPPA, friend to CaesarDOLABELLA, friend to CaesarPROCULEIUS, friend to CaesarTHYREUS, friend to CaesarGALLUS, friend to CaesarMENAS, friend to PompeyMENECRATES, friend to PompeyVARRIUS, friend to PompeyTAURUS, Lieutenant-General to CaesarCANIDIUS, Lieutenant-General to AntonySILIUS, an Officer in Ventidius

Good morning'said Hans, leaning on his spade, and smiling from ear to ear.

Uh . . . believing in yourself. Thatssa good one. And, uh. . . wait, wait.. . theressone coming. Uh. . . yeah, thatssit: walking in dignity. I guesssI would call it walking in dignity. I dont know how to put that into a better concept, either, but it hassto do with the way one carriessoneself in onesslife, and the way one honorssothers, and the path otherssare taking.

I wished to go in and look at him but I had not the courage to knock. I walked away slowly along the sunny side of the street, reading all the theatrical advertisements in the shop-windows as I went. I found it strange that neither I nor the day seemed in a mourning mood and I felt even annoyed at discovering in myself a sensation of freedom as if I had been freed from something by his death. I wondered at this for, as my uncle had said the night before, he had taught me a great deal. He had studied in the Irish college in Rome and he had taught me to pronounce Latin properly. He had told me stories about the catacombs and about Napoleon Bonaparte, and he had explained to me the meaning of the different ceremonies of the Mass and of the different vestments worn by the priest. Sometimes he had amused himself by putting difficult questions to me, asking me what one should do in certain circumstances or whether such and such sins were mortal or venial or only imperfections. His questions showed me how complex and mysterious were certain institutions of the Church which I had always regarded as the simplest acts. The duties of the priest towards the Eucharist and towards the secrecy of the confessional seemed so grave to me that I wondered how anybody had ever found in himself the courage to undertake themand I was not surprised when he told me that the fathers of the Church had written books as thick as the Post Office Directory and as closely printed as the law notices in the newspaper, elucidating all these intricate questions. Often when I thought of this I could make no answer or only a very foolish and halting one upon which he used to smile and nod his head twice or thrice. Sometimes he used to put me through the responses of the Mass which he had made me learn by heartand, as I pattered, he used to smile pensively and nod his head, now and then pushing huge pinches of snuff up each nostril alternately. When he smiled he used to uncover his big discoloured teeth and let his tongue lie upon his lower lip--a habit which had made me feel uneasy in the beginning of our acquaintance before I knew him well.

ll stay with you tonight, Captain, he saidthen turned to the sailor and told him to haul the boat out and to find shelter for himself and fellows.

Proprietor.

The Road goes ever on and onOut from the door where it beganNow far ahead the Road has gone,Let others follow it who canLet them a journey new begin,But I at last with weary feetWill turn towards the lighted inn,My evening rest and sleep to meet

Good morning'said Hans, leaning on his spade, and smiling from ear to ear.

Proprietor.

We asked you today to help us break up housekeeping, he said with his winning smile; but I must confess that I for one have deceived you. I planned to get you all here for a totally different purpose, and I trust you will approve of my craftiness when you have seen what I have to show you.

The Road goes ever on and onOut from the door where it beganNow far ahead the Road has gone,Let others follow it who canLet them a journey new begin,But I at last with weary feetWill turn towards the lighted inn,My evening rest and sleep to meet

Uh . . . believing in yourself. Thatssa good one. And, uh. . . wait, wait.. . theressone coming. Uh. . . yeah, thatssit: walking in dignity. I guesssI would call it walking in dignity. I dont know how to put that into a better concept, either, but it hassto do with the way one carriessoneself in onesslife, and the way one honorssothers, and the path otherssare taking.

for Religions sake.

But in the first place, dear ladies, allow me to plead that gin-and-water, like obesity, or baldness, or the gout, does not exclude a vast amount of antecedent romance, any more than the neatly-executed fronts which you may some day wear, will exclude your present possession of less expensive braids. Alas, alas we poor mortals are often little better than wood-ashesthere is small sign of the sap, and the leafy freshness, and the bursting buds that were once there; but wherever we see wood-ashes, we know that all that early fullness of life must have been. I, at least, hardly ever look at a bent old man, or a wizened old woman, but I see also, with my minds eye, that Past of which they are the shrunken remnant, and the unfinished romance of rosy cheeks and bright eyes seems sometimes of feeble interest and significance, compared with that drama of hope and love which has long ago reached its catastrophe, and left the poor soul, like a dim and dusty stage, with all its sweet garden-scenes and fair perspectives overturned and thrust out of sight.

And the Warden said: Then I release her from my charge and bid her farewell, and may she suffer never hurt nor sickness again I commend her to the care of the Steward of the City, until her brother returns

Thatssexactly what Im saying

Thatssexactly what Im saying

The paper seems to me to be of no practical importance,

Good morning'said Hans, leaning on his spade, and smiling from ear to ear.

A very good suggestion. Unfortunately, I have no control over them.

I wished to go in and look at him but I had not the courage to knock. I walked away slowly along the sunny side of the street, reading all the theatrical advertisements in the shop-windows as I went. I found it strange that neither I nor the day seemed in a mourning mood and I felt even annoyed at discovering in myself a sensation of freedom as if I had been freed from something by his death. I wondered at this for, as my uncle had said the night before, he had taught me a great deal. He had studied in the Irish college in Rome and he had taught me to pronounce Latin properly. He had told me stories about the catacombs and about Napoleon Bonaparte, and he had explained to me the meaning of the different ceremonies of the Mass and of the different vestments worn by the priest. Sometimes he had amused himself by putting difficult questions to me, asking me what one should do in certain circumstances or whether such and such sins were mortal or venial or only imperfections. His questions showed me how complex and mysterious were certain institutions of the Church which I had always regarded as the simplest acts. The duties of the priest towards the Eucharist and towards the secrecy of the confessional seemed so grave to me that I wondered how anybody had ever found in himself the courage to undertake themand I was not surprised when he told me that the fathers of the Church had written books as thick as the Post Office Directory and as closely printed as the law notices in the newspaper, elucidating all these intricate questions. Often when I thought of this I could make no answer or only a very foolish and halting one upon which he used to smile and nod his head twice or thrice. Sometimes he used to put me through the responses of the Mass which he had made me learn by heartand, as I pattered, he used to smile pensively and nod his head, now and then pushing huge pinches of snuff up each nostril alternately. When he smiled he used to uncover his big discoloured teeth and let his tongue lie upon his lower lip--a habit which had made me feel uneasy in the beginning of our acquaintance before I knew him well.

Good morning'said Hans, leaning on his spade, and smiling from ear to ear.

But in the first place, dear ladies, allow me to plead that gin-and-water, like obesity, or baldness, or the gout, does not exclude a vast amount of antecedent romance, any more than the neatly-executed fronts which you may some day wear, will exclude your present possession of less expensive braids. Alas, alas we poor mortals are often little better than wood-ashesthere is small sign of the sap, and the leafy freshness, and the bursting buds that were once there; but wherever we see wood-ashes, we know that all that early fullness of life must have been. I, at least, hardly ever look at a bent old man, or a wizened old woman, but I see also, with my minds eye, that Past of which they are the shrunken remnant, and the unfinished romance of rosy cheeks and bright eyes seems sometimes of feeble interest and significance, compared with that drama of hope and love which has long ago reached its catastrophe, and left the poor soul, like a dim and dusty stage, with all its sweet garden-scenes and fair perspectives overturned and thrust out of sight.

for Religions sake.

And the Warden said: Then I release her from my charge and bid her farewell, and may she suffer never hurt nor sickness again I commend her to the care of the Steward of the City, until her brother returns

Danger What danger do you foresee?

A very good suggestion. Unfortunately, I have no control over them.

The paper seems to me to be of no practical importance,

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